History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

120 HiSTORY OF TEXAS.

State, he studied law at Vicksburg, Mississippi,
and was admitted to practice in the
supreme court of that State in 1835, and was
soon afterward appointed district attorney.
Removing later to New OrleaLs, he took an
active part in politics, being a thorough
Democrat of the State-rights sc'iool, and he
won a high reputation. After the war broke
out he organized what was known as Waul's
Legion, which he commanded ir many hotly
contested engagements. At its close he settled
in Galveston. where he resumed his profession,
and was elected president of the bar
association.
In 1837 the General married Miss Mary
Simmons, a native of Georgia, and in November,
1887, celebrated his golden wedding.
BEN MCCULLOUGH, prominent in the last
war, was a native of Tennessee, came to Texas
during revolutionary times, and commanded
a cannon in the battle of San Jacinto. After
the independence of Texas he was captain of
a company of rangers. During the last war
hewas appointed brigadier general in the
Confederate army, and was killed in the
second day's fight at Pea Ridge, Arkansas,
March 24, 1862.
GENERAL HENRY EUSTACE McCULLOCH was
born in Rutherford county, Tennessee, December
6, 1816, and first came to Texas in
the autumn of 1835, accompanied by his
brother, Ben McCulloch, five years older.
Arriving at iNacogdoches, they bad an argument
as to the propriety of Henry's coming
on. Ben tried almost every way to persuade
him to return home, but in vain, until he hit
upon the argument that he should take care
of his parents in their old age. Selling their
horses, fine saddle animals, they separated,
starting off on foot, one east and the other
west

In the fall of 1837 Henry came again to
Texas and stopped at Washington, then the
capital of the State, and passed the winter
there hewing house logs, splitting red-oak
boards and building board houses. In the
spring he joined a party in the exploration of
the upper Brazos. While out hunting one
day, in company with another member of tihe
party, they chanced upon a company of five
Indians, whom they attacked, killed two and
chased the other three away! In the summer
of 1838 he joined his brother, Ben, at Gonzales
and formed a partnership with him in
surveying and locating lands, and this
partnership lasted until the death of the
brother in 1862.
During pioneer times both the brothers
engaged in much ranger service, with skill
and good fortune, the particulars of which we
have not space for here.
During a battle with the Comanches in
1840, Henry saved the life of Dr. Sweitzer, a
bitter enemy of his brother, by driving away
the Indians who where about to take the life
of the doctor. Henry had dismounted and
taken his position behind a small sapling in
advance of the main Texan force and was
pouring hot shot into the ranks of the enemy,
who, in return, had completely scaled the
bark of the little tree behind which he stood.
Arch. Gipson and Alsey Miller had come up
and were sitting on their horses near Henry,
who was standing on the ground beside his
horse, when suddenly Gipson or Miller cried
out, "They'll catch him; they'll catch him!"
McCulloch asked, "Catch who?" The reply
was, "Sweitzer."
Glancing over his horse's neck the gallant
young McCulloch saw a party of eight or ten
Indians closely pursuing the bitterest enemy
of his brother; but the life of a human being
was involved, and, prompted by that magna

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120

HISTO R YOF TEXA S

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 31, 2014.