History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

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HISTORY OF TEXAS.

Late in the evening Mr. Wilbarger so far
recovered as to drag himself to a pool of
water, lay in it for an hour, and then, benumbed
with cold, he crawled upon dry
ground and fell into a profound sleep. When
awakened the blood had ceased to flow from
his wounds, but he was still consumed with
hunger and again suffering intensely from
thirst. Green flies had "blown" his scalp
while asleep and the larves began to work,
which created a new alarm. Undertaking to
go to Mr. Hornsby's, about six miles distant,
lie had only proceeded about 600 yards when
he sank exhausted! Remaining all night upon
the ground, he suffered intensely from cold;
but during the next day he was found by his
friends, who had been urged to hunt for him
by Mrs. Hornsby, despite the report by Haynie
and Standifer that he was dead. She was
influenced by a dream, so the story goes, to
say that Wilbarger was still alive, and consequently
urged the men to go and hunt for
him. It is stated also that Wilbarger had a
dream or vision of the spirit of a sister, who
had died only the day before in Missouri,
which said that help would come that day!
The relief party consisted of Joseph Rogers,
Reuben Hornsby, Webber, John Walters and
others. As they approached the tree under
which Wilbarger was lying and had passed
the night, they saw first the blood-red scalp
and thought they had come upon an Indian.
Even his body was red almost all over with
blood, and lie presented a ghastly sight.
Rogers, mistaking him for an Indian, exclaimed,
"Here they are, boys!" Wilbarger
arose and said, "Don't shoot! it is Wilbarger!
The poor sufferer was taken to Hornsby's
residence, where lie was cared for. When he
had somewhat recruited he was placed in a
sled, as lie could not endure the jolts of a
wagon. and taken down the river to his own

cabin. He lived eleven years afterward, but
the scalp never grew to entirely cover the
bone. The latter, where most exposed, became
diseased and exfoliated, finally exposing
the brain.
By his death he left a wife and five children.
The eldest son, John, was killed many
years afterward by the Indians in west Texas.
Harvey, another son, lived to raise a number
of children.
The circumstance above related is the first
instance of white blood shed at the hands of
the red savage within the present limits of
Travis county.
GENERAL EDWARD BURLESON was born in
Buncombe county, North Carolina, in 1798.
We quote the following sketch of his life
from J. W. Wilbarger's work, before referred
to:
"When but a lad, young Edward served
in a company commanded by his father under
General Jackson, in the Creek war. In
March, 1831, lie emigrated to Texas and settled
eleven miles below the town of Bastrop,
where he soon rendered himself conspicuous
by his readiness when called on to repel the
savages, then of frequent occurrence. His
unflinching courage and perseverance on such
occasions brought him into favorable notice,
.and in 1832 he was elected lieutenant colonel
of the principality of Austin. By his activity,
promptness and courage, he soon rose to
be an acknowledged leader, while his plain
and unpretending deportment and natural
dignity won friends as fast as he made acquaintances.

"In the battle with the Mexicans under
General Cos at San Antonio he was conspicuous
for his gallantry and rendered important
services. As colonel of a regiment he participated
in the final battle at San Jacinto,
which secured the independence of Texas.

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 12, 2014.