History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

t-fSTORY ob' TEXAS. 15t4

ware, but in Grimes and Robertson counties
(and possibly in others as well) clays of higher
grade are found.
Kaolin.-In Robertson county, not far
from the town of Mexia, there is a deposit
of sandy clay which is readily separated by
washing into a kaolin of excellent quality
and a perfectly pure quartz sand. This
kaolin has been tested practically and produces
a good porcelain.
Potteries have been erected in various
parts of the State within the limits of the
Fayette and timber-belt beds for the manufacture
of common earthenware, flower pots,
etc., and several are now in successful operation.
Among localities of potteries may be
mentioned Lavernia, Wilson county; Athens,
Henderson county; Kosse, Limestone county;
Burton, Washington county, and others.
In addition to the kaolin already mentioned
in Robertson county, kaolins of excellent
quality are found in Edwards and
Uvalde counties. These are pure white in
color, somewhat greasy to the touch, and are
infusible in the hottest blow-pipe flame.
Being practically free from iron, they are
adapted to the making of the best grades
of china. They are free from grit and
every other objectionable impurity. A comparison
of the analyses of these kaolins with
those of established reputation more fully
show their value.
Of the other materials needed in the manufacture
of pottery, we have deposits of feldspar
well suited for glazing; gypsum for the
manufacture of plaster of paris for molds;
clays suitable for the saggers, and cheap fuel
in abundance.
BUILDING MATERIALS.
The variety and widespread occurrence (of
the rocks of Texas suitable for construction

is so great that it will be imnpracticable to
allude to them in any other than general
terms. They will therefore be grouped under
general headings.
Granites occur in widely separated portions
of the State. Thle first locality is what
has been termed in the reports the central
mineral region, the second is in the extreme
west, or trans-Pecos Texas. The granites of
the first or central region are of different
colors. The best known is the red granite,
such as was used in the construction of the
capitol building. The color is red to dark
reddish-gray, varying from fine to rather
coarse grain in structure, and susceptible of
high polish. The outcrop of the granite,
which can be quarried to any desired dimensions,
covers an area of over 100 square
miles.
There is a quarry now in operation on the
portion from which the granite was taken for
the building of the capitol, on account of
which it was originally opened, the material
used having been donated by the owners,
Colonel Norton, Dr. Westfall and George
W. Lacy.
Besides this particular granite there are
many others in this region which will prove
as useful. In the northern part of Gillespie
county there is a brownish granite of very
grain which takes a beautiful polish; and in
addition there are found in various portions
of the region granites varying in color from
light to dark gray, which are well adapted
for building purposes, and in some instances
will prove of decided value for ornamental
and monumental purposes.
The granites of trans-Pecos Texas, like
those of the central mineral region, are well
suited both for building and ornamental purpoees.
The western granites, however, lack
the variety of color which is found in those

i59

AtrSTOR Y O TEEXAS.

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed May 24, 2015.