History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

and shows zinc and bismuth in greater into the same lead. This mine is 5,095 feet
depths. The zinc sometimes amounts to 30 above the sea level, which, when compared
per cent. of the whole, and even pure argent- with the deepest body of the Bonanza, shows
iterous zinc ores are found. One fact ob- an ore body 450 feet in height by about
served is that on the northeast slopes of the 4,000 feet long. The ore body of the Alice
mountains uranium is found in connection Ray, like that of the Bonanza, is a well dewith
the ores, while on the southwest slopes fined vein of galena, running from two to
this metal gives place to molybdenum even eight and ten inches in width.
on the same vein traced across the crest of There are many other valuable prospects
the mountain. in this district, which are more fully descri bed
There are a number of shallow prospect in the reports.
holes scattered over this region, but very few Besides the ores of this district, ores are
of them reach a depth of fifty feet. found in districts on the east and south. The
Several mines haxe, however, made ship- Chinati region is, however, the only other
ments of ore, the principal being from one in which much prospecting has been
the Alice Ray and Bonanza mines, both of done. Here there. are a great many proswhich
are on the same vein. Their ores pecting shafts, as well as some well develhave
an average value of $60 to $65; but oped mines. The ore on the river side is
owing to the fact that they contain 25 to 30 galena, the outcrops being strongly ferrnuper
cent. of zinc and that the El Paso smelt- ginous streaks, similiar to those of the
ers are not prepared to properly treat such Quitman mountains. Some outcrops show
ores, it has not been found possible to work carbonates and sulphides containing both
them profitably after paying for roasting the bismuth and silver. An assay of one of these
zinc out of the ores in place of receiving pay outcrops gave silver ten ounces, bismuth
for it. The Bonanza is the best developed three and five-tenths, lead forty and fivemine
in the Quitman range. The lead runs tenths per cent. On the eastern side the conabout
east and west, dipping almost verti- tacts between the porphyries and crystalline
cally in a contact between granite and por- limestones are very clearly marked, and it is
phyry. A shaft ninety-five feet deep is sunk on these that the most satisfactory prospect.
to a drift below, running on the vein and ing work has been done. These yield both
about 350 feet in length, which shows a seam fine milling silver and galenas.
of galena from two to ten inches in thick- In the other ranges examined to the south
ness. This carries an average of about thirty and east similiar ores also exist, but they are
ounces of silver, although it sometimes at present so difficult of access that little
reaches as high as sixty ounces, to the ton. work has been done on them.
The shipping average of this ore is about 30 Gold.-The precious metals occur in conper
cent. of lead, 25 to 30 per cent. zinc, and nection with the ores of copper, lead, and
thirty ounces of silver, to the ton, and about zinc, as has already been stated under those
500 tons have been shipped. From the drift heads. They occur also in a free state. Small
a winze is sunk 110 feet deep. amounts of free gold have been found by
On the Alice Ray claim, at a distance of panning in the Colorado river and in some
3,000 feet from the Bonanza, a tunnel is run parts of Llano county, but the amount found

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed October 1, 2014.