History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

IIISFhRY OF TEXAS. 171

tin in little globules scattered through it.
While it is impossible to speak positively
of the probable quantity of ore, the indications
are favorable for its existence in amounts
sufficient to be of economic value.
In trans-Pecos Texas tin has been found in
connection with some of the ores of the
Quitman range.
Mercury.-Like tin, this metal has been
reported from several localities, but up to the
present we have not succeeded in verifying
any of the reports or of finding any traces
of it.
Manannese.-The only workable deposits
of manganese yet defined by the survey are
those of the central mineral region. These
deposits are both in the form of manganese
ores and of combinations of iron and manganese
ores in different proportions. The Spiller
mine, south of Fly Gap, Mason county, is the
only known occurrence of the manganese ore
on an extensive scale anywhere in the region,
although surface croppings were traced,
which seemed to indicate companion belts to
the one which has been opened at the locality
mentioned.
The ore is rather siliceous psilomelane, with
patches of pyrolusite and more or less black
wad, filling cavities and crevices in the vein,
which is three or four feet wide. The ore
seems to lie as an interbedded vein, and numerous
borings were made on it with a diamond
drill, presumably for the purpose of
prospecting in the direction of its dip.
Manganese ores are found under similar
circumstances in the region between Packsaddle
and Riley mountains, and specimens
are reported both from Gillespie and Blanco
counties. Manganese also occurs as an ingredient
of the various limonitic ores, and in
one instance such an ore was found to contain
as much as eleven per cent. of this metal,

in the form of dioxide. These deposits, however,
are not likely to prove of much economic
value.
Bismuth occurs in small quantities in connection
with the ores of the Quitman range,
and in one vein examined in the region of the
Chinati mountains as much as three and onehalf
per cent. of this metal was found in the
ore (galena).
ABRASIVES.
Buhrstone.-In the Fayette sands are
found stones of excellent quality for use as
millstones. In Jasper and other counties
millstones which have given perfect satisfaction
in use have been cut from certain horizons
of these sands.
G6indstones.-Certain sandstones in the
Carboniferous and older formations furnish
excellent materials for grindstones, but up to
the present they have been utilized only
locally.
No whetstones have yet been manufactured
in Texas, although excellent material exists
for such a purpose. The Fayette sands
probably furnish the best of the material,
and some specimens from Fayette county are
now in the State museum. Other material
suitable for the purpose is found in the central
mineral region and in the central coal
field.
Several localities of deposits of infusorial
earth are known in Hopkins, Leon, Polk and
Crosby counties. Very little has been mined
for shipment.
ORNAMENTAL STONES AND GEMS.
Among the gem stones may be mentioned
beryl, smoky quartz, rose quartz, silicified
wood, garnet, agate, moss agate, amethyst,
jasper, sardonyx, tourmaline, and others.

HISTOY OF EXAS

17i

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed April 20, 2014.