History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

19;

HISTORY OP TEXAS.

age in cotton. The average production per
acre was 14.38 bushels, which is an average
yield during an unseasonable year, when we
consider that Texas is not classed among the
corn-producing States as a source from whence
the demand for maize may be supplied. The
average production in the corn-growing States
for years, according to the National Department
of Agriculture, was 24.2 bushels per
acre.
The estimated annual consumption for the
past ten years was 28 bushels per capita.
On this basis the account of the State, so far
as it relates to the item of corn, would stand
as follows: Bushels produced, 41,812,904;
bushels necessary for home consumption,
62,594,644; deficit, 20,781,780.
WHEAT.
The returns for 1890 show a slight decrease
in the acreage of wheat compared with 1889.
The acreage in wheat for the four years past
has been as follows: In 1887, 520,219; in
1888, 386,120; in 1889, 402,154, and in
1890, 359,440. There has been a constant
decrease in the acreage in wheat in the northern
portion of the State, where formerly the
bulk of the wheat grown in the State was
produced. This decrease has, in a measure,
been compensated for by the opening of new
farms in the Panhandle, which is fast becoming
the granary of the State. The soil
and climate of that section are admirably
adapted to wheat-growing, and with favorable
meteorological conditions that section will
supply the demand for home consumption
and furnish a large surplus for exportation.
The Secretary of Agriculture, in his report
for 1890, estimates the consumption of wheat
at 41 bushels per capita. On this basis of

consumption the account of the State on the
item of wheat for 1890 stands as follows:
Bushels necessary for home consumptionl,
10,432,442; bushels produced in the State,
2,365,523; bushels imported for home con
sumption, 8,066,917.
The value of the wheat imported, at 65
cents per bushel, the average value of the
crop, amounted to $5,243,496.05, which is
approximately the sum sent out of the State
for flour during the year.
The average production per acre is quite a
decrease from the previous year, being 6.58
bushels, against 13 for 1889. There was a
material decline in the average price per
bushel, it being 65 cents, as against 71 for
the previous year. The tendency to lower
prices and consequent diminution of gross
returns per acre in wheat has been very
marked during the past ten years, as shown
by the reports of the Secretaiy of Agriculture
for 1890. The decline has been from $13
per acre to $9.97.
OATS.
There was a large decrease in the acreage
in oats in 1890, attributable to putting oats
land in cotton. The average value per bushel
of oats in the United States in 1889 was 22.9
cents, and the average value per acre was
$6 26. In this State the average for 1890
was $9.46 per acre, and 48 cents per bushel.
Owing to the fact that there is no means of
knowing what the average annual consumption
per capita of oats is, it is impossible to
determine exactly whether the supply exceeds
the demand or not. The vast amount
of open range and enclosed pasture land curtails
largely the annual consumption of oats
in this State.

C

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed October 20, 2014.