History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

194 JIIS~~~o~r OP T~~XAS.

RYE.
Rye is sown mostly for pasturage in this
State, there being little if any demand for it
in local markets. The average yield per acre
in the United States for 1888 was 12 bushels,
and the average value per bushel 58 cents.
The crop of 1889 in this State averaged 14
bushels per acre, and the average value per
bushel was 85 cents.
BARLEY.
The barley crop is of small importance in
this State. In fact the yield is not a fair
average of what might be produced under
different conditions. Most of the barley
sown is planted for pasturage, there being
little or no demand for it except for seed.
The yield, therefore, represents what is harvested
after the pasturing season is past, and
gathered mainly for seed.
HAY.
Upon this crop the language used in the
report of 1888 is still appropriate:
,, Uuder this heading is included sorghum
cane cut for bay, cultivated hay, millet and
prairie hay, standing in value per acre in
order above presented. Sorghum cane hay
is most profitable, showing the highest average
yield per acre. It is affected less by
drouth than any other cultivated product, and
in favorable seasons two crops can be easily
grown. The acreage in cultivated hay indicates
the extent to which farmers.are turning
attention to the various varieties of
grasses that niust soon become a part of the
crop on every well conducted farq."
The average value per acre of the different

hay crops was as follows: Sorghum cane
hay, $17.75; cultivated hay, $10.88; prairie
hay, $5.27; millet, $12.87.
POTATOES.
Sweet Potatoes.-There was a decrease in
the acreage in sweet potatoes as compared to
1888, and a decrease in the average yield per
acre. The average value per acre of this
crop in 1889 was $57.50, and for the past
four years was $57.83. The average yield
per acre for the past four years was 123.11
bushels. The demand for the pure yellow
yam has never been fully supplied. While
not so prolific as other varieties, it bears a
higher market value and can be readily sold.
Irish.-There was an increase in the acre-f
age in Irish potatoes in 1890. Owing to the
inability of preserving them for any considerable
length of time in this climate, the production
of Irish potatoes for the general
market is not undertaken at all. The local
markets are supplied with them when the
crop first matures, but beyond this their production
is adjusted to the demands of the
farm on which they are cultivated. Our soil
is admirably adapted to the production of
Irish potatoes, and the average yield per acre
is considerably above the national average.
The average annual- yield per acre in the
United States for the ten years ending in
1888 was 87.7 bushels, while in this State
the average annual yield per acre for four
years past (which is as far back as we have
an accurate record) was 101.67 bushels.
SORGHUM CANE.
The large decline in the acreage of sorghum
cane devoted to the production of sorghum
cane syrup is not easily accounted for, unless

194

III,,QPO1? OP TZXAS.

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed December 26, 2014.