History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HIS'TORY OF TEXAS.

of 1848, in swarms from the north, lighting
and depositing their eggs everywhere, and
preferring sandy land for the deposit of eggs.
After eating all the garden products, which
they would do in a short time, they disappeared,
no one knowing whither they went.
The warm sun of the following March again
brought the little hoppers out, which stiddenly
consumed every green thing and fled
northward. Tlhe crops were again planted
and the season proved favorable.
In October, 1856, they came again, as before,
with the early north winds. After
eating the blades off the wheat and depositing
their eggs, they disappeared. During
the next spring myriads of young hoppers, as
before, about the size of large fleas, issued
from the ground, and did but little mischief
until about three weeks old, when they were
half grown. They then moulted and started
northward on foot, preserving as much regularity
and order in their march as an army of
well drilled soldiers. Exercise had of course
a marked effect upon their appetites, wlhicl
impelled them to be ravenous, preferring tlhe
young cotton to everything else, next tlIe
young corn, etc. When one was killed or
wounded, he would be immediately devoured
by his fellows! In their march they had no
respect for the dwellings of human beings or
animals, but would march right along through
them without fear. At the age of six weeks
they moulted again and were full-grown
grasshoppers. In a few days their wings
were ready for a prolonged flight, which they
took, northward.
The ensuing autumn they were here again,
acting as before. The next spring the young
came forth again, but this time there were
added to their already immense numbers
another horde which had been driven back in
their march by a heavy norther. These latter

had been bred between the Colorado and the
gulf. After remaining long enough to consumie
nearly all that the native locu-ts had
left, they resumed their migration. In the
fall of 1858 the pests were again seenl, highly
up in the air, passing southward.
In their flight their wings glitter in the
sul,, so that the sky seems to be overcast by
a shining snow flurry. They come with the
north wind in the fall, and return with tlhe
south wind in the spring.
PAtRONS OF IU'SBiANDRY.
The Patrons of HIlulbandry, or Grange, is
the oldest farmers' organization of State-widle
influence in the State, and according to the
estimate of lion. A. J. Rose, Master of tlhe
State (range, numbers between 10,000 and
15,000 active members, and has a non-affiliating
membership approxi mating 100,000 in
the State. The order has been the means of
accomplishing great good in behalf of t!he
farming population of the State, mainly by
constantly keeping before the agricultural
classes the necessity of a strict ol)-ervance of
the principles of economy in tlIe management
of the farm, avoiding extravagant, useless expenditures,
and producing as far as possible
all necessary supplies at home. Farmers who
practice the principles of the Pat ohns of 1Husbandry
do not contribute to the annual outflow
of money from the State for tlie purchase
of bacon, lard, molasses and other farm
supplies that can be produced on Texas soil,
and are not in debt to the money-lending
classes. Thle Grange numbers among its adherents
in this State some of thie most intelligent,
thrifty and conservative farmers of the
State-men who would be an honor to any
organization, and whose names are a guarantee
of success in any enterprise with which
they may connect themselves,

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 31, 2015.