History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

216

218 HISTORY OF TEXAS.

Qcean-going vessels which have entered
and cleared from this port for seven months,

ending March 31, are as follows:
No.
Entered from foreign ports.... 162
Entered from domestic ports.. 203
Cleared for foreign ports ..... 176
Cleared for domestic ports .... 202
Total ....................743

Tons.
194,883
241,468
246,613
271,176
954,140

Ocean-going vessels have brought into and
carried out of this port iti twelve months,
ending June 30, 1891 (May and June estimated
to equal previous year), merchandise
and products amounting in value toImports,
foreign and domestic.. $87,000,000
Exports, foreign and domestic.. 84,000,000
Total value ............... $171,000,000
Imports consisting of miscellaneous merchandise,
coal, etc., mainly from New York
and other Atlantic ports, foreign imports
being less than one-third of the total. Exports,
mainly cotton, amounting to about
$50,000,000, the other $34,000,000 being
made up of wool, grain, flour, other agricultural
products, and the product of our
factories, of which the United States Governmnent
reports by the late census we have over
300 in operation. The near-by coastwise
traffic carried on in small steamers and sloops
amounts annually to many millions of dollars,
and it is safe to say the port of Galveston
does an annual business exceeding in value
$200,000,000, to which, in order to obtain
the vast volume of business transacted in
Galveston, should be added to wholesale
merchandise business, amounting to nearly
$60,000,000 per annum, the annual output of
our 304 manufactories, amounting to #veral
millions of dollars, and the bank clearances,
which far exceed $250,000,000 per annum.

The city has an available wharf frontage
on Galveston channel of over 6,000 feet. Its
beach is said to be unsurpassed by any other
on the American continent. It extends the
whole length of the island east and west, and
nearly straight, and almost as smooth as a
floor.
There are two lines of steamships plying
between Galveston and New York city, with
a daily line to New Orleans, and another to
Indianola and Corpus Crhisti, a weekly line
to Havana, and a semi-monthly line to
London.
The entrance to Galveston harbor is obstructed
by an inner and an outer bar, the
removal of which has been undertaken by the
United States Government. The work was
begun in 1874, but the appropriations have
been inadequate, and the work is still incomplete,
but very -satisfactory as far as prosecuted.
The water on the bar is steadily
increasing in depth, and vessels are now
passing over the bar drawing fifteen feet of
water. The number of vessels requiring
lightering before passing over the bar are
fewer as the increased depth of water on the
bar permits them to come in and discharge
their cargoes. The work of deepening the
water over the bar may be considered as
experimental, but of sufficient importance to
demonstrate the fact that when the work
proposed is completed deep water over the bar
varying from 18 to 20 feet will have been
secured. The last report of the engineer in
charge of the work shows a gain of six inches
on the bar at mean low tide. In 1885 13
feet was the maximum depth over the bar.
In 1886 only one vessel went out over the bar
drawing 14 feet of water.
Galveston is a beautiful city, with wide and
straight streets and elegant parks. It has a
number of costly public buildings. Oleander

MISTORY F EXS

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed August 29, 2014.