History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

222 ft-a~oaY OP TEXAS.

in Hopkins county, grew in population from
1?000 in 1870 to 3,038 in 1890, and the
assessed values increased from $800,000 in
1880 to $1,300,000 in 1890. This place also
has a number of medicinal wells and springs.
Temple, in Bell county, is at the intersection
of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas and the
Gulf, Colorado & Santa F6 railroads, has a
population of 6,500, and is a new and growing
city.
Terrell, thirty-two miles east of Dallas, is
situated on the Texas & Pacific Railroad, is a
great shipping point for cattle, and is abundantly
supplied with wells of good water.
In 1890 it had a population of 2,977. The
Terrell Institute is a good school at the
place.
Tyler, the county seat of Smith county, is
on the northern division of the International
& Great Northern Railroad, and on the Cotton
Belt road, had a population of 6,908 in
1890, has the Charnwood Institute as one of
its local institutions of learning, and a public
library of 10,000 volumes. One daily
and two weekly newspapers flourish there,
and the principal shops and general offices of
the Cotton Belt Railroad for Texas, are located
at that place.
Victoria, on the Southern Pacific Railroad,
in Victoria county, had 3,500 inhabitants in
1890. Being on the east bank of the Guadalupe
river, the prosperity of the place has
been chiefly derived from navigation and the
shipment of cattle, etc.
Waco is a live city at the intersection of
several railroads, and had a population of 14,425
in 1890. Assessed value of all property
in 1891, $10,212,642. There are about seven
square miles within the corporate limits.
Waxahachie, the county seat of Ellis
county, is a railroad center, with a pfnulation
in 1890 of 8,076. The county is the banner

one in the black-waxy district. As a sample
of the improvement made, we may state that
about $130,000 a year is expended in public
and private improvements.
Weatherford, the capital of Parker county,
is located at a railroad junction, sixty-six
miles west of Dallas. Number of inhabitants
in 1890, 3,314; assessed valuation of
all property in 1891, $1,572,772.
MISCELLANEOUS.
" INDIAN DEPREDATIONS IN TEXAS."
The above is the title of a most interesting
book to Texans, and even to the rest of the
world, recently published by J. W. Wilbarger,
from which liberal quotations have been
made in this work. We only hope that the
quotations we have made will whet the appetite
of the Texan public for the purchase
of that book. Stories have interest only in
their details, and such are given in that wi'rk.
and they cannot be condensed for a larger'
publication like this, and therefore only
extracts could be given in this volume.
The work is illustrated with graphic pictures,
and arranged by counties and dates in the
index, so that ready reference can be made to
any point.
From the above work we give the following
story in our miscellaneous department:
THE FORT PARKER MASSACRE.
",The following graphic account of the
Fort Parker massacre has been gathered from
several reliable sources, but the greatest portion
of them has been by the kind consent of
James T. De Shield, copied from a little
book published by him, entitled 'Cynthia
Ann Parker.' In fact everything, from the
conclusion of the extract from Mrs. Plum

222

RUSTORY OP' TEAM.Y

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 26, 2014.