History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

IIlSTORY OF TEXAS.

Riurr at this time to set up an independent
government somewhere in the. Southwest,
had also an aggravating tendency in the complication
of civil affairs between the two governments,
and served to impel Spain and
Mexico to adopt more stringent hostile rneasures
by way of resistance. After some exchange
of correspondence, General James
Wilkinson, on the part of the United States,
arrived at the Sabine river with a command
of soldiers, and succeeded by a short bloodless
campaign in establishing that river as the temporary
boundary line between the nations,
and soon returned to New Orleans to resume
operations against the contemplated movements
of Aaron Burr.
A period of calm followed the last transaction,
more thoroughly established by the
diversion of public attention to war in
Europe. Agriculture would have made more
rapid progress in Texas had there not been
the suspicions of unwelcome that naturally
lingered in the minds of the immigrants.
An unforeseen evil, however, arose out of the
late compact. The neutral territory soon
became the asylum of a large number of desperadoes
and marauders, who organized
themselves into a community under a system
similar to that of the old buccaneers, and
they preyed upon all who came in their way.
Their bravery and audacity were unsurpassed,
and their fidelity to each other was
inflexible. Traders were convoyed across the
territory of these outlaws by military escorts,
which, however, were frequently attacked. The
Spanish authorities made every effort to eject
them, and twice the United States authorities
drove them off and burned their houses; but
these measures failed to suppress them_
In 1810 Cordero, the Governor o/Texas,
was promoted to the governorship of the
more populous province of Coahuila, and in

his place as Governor of Texas Manuel de
Salcedo was appointed. In September ot
that year Hidalgo raised the standard of independence,
and, during the long bloody
struggle which followed, the province of
Texas was made the scene of deeds as horrifying
as Hidalgo's massacre of his prisoners
and Calleja's atrocities at Guanajuato.
In January, 1811, Juan Bautista Casas, a
captain of the militia, took forcible possession
of the Texan government by seizing the
governor and other leading officers, and proclaiming
himself governor, at the same time
publicly advocating the cause of Hidalgo;
but he soon disgusted many of the revolutionary
party (his own) by his despotic and
disorderly administration, and Juan Manuel
Zambrano conceived the idea of restoring
the old order of things. Concealing his real
intention, he hoodwinked those of the dissatisfied
whom he approached on the matter,
by giving them to understand that his only
object was to depose Casas and correct the
disorders of government. He was, moreover,
favored in his designs by the opportune
arrival of the unfortunate Aldama, who, with
a large amount of bullion, was proceeding to
the United States as envoy of the Independents,
there to solicit aid in arms and men.
Zambrano cunningly caused the report to be
spread among the lower orders that Aldama
was an emissary of Napoleon,-a statement
more readily believed on account of his uniform
being similar to that of a French aidde-camp.
Nothing aroused the indignation
of the common people more than the idea of
their being surrendered to the French. By
casting the gloomy shadow of that danger
over the minds of his Indians, Hidalgo had
lately caused the Grito de Dolores to be
raised and rung through the land; and now
this wily priest used the same guile in Texas

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed August 2, 2014.