History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

lISToItY OP0 TEXAS.

secreted themselves in a small creek bottom,
some distance from the first party, each unconscious
of the others' whereabouts. At
twilight Abram Anglin and Evan Faulkenberry
started back to the fort to succor the
wounded and those who might have escaped.
On their way and jnst as they were passing
Faulkenherry's cabin. Anglin saw his first
and only ghost. HI-e says: ' It was dressed
in white with long white hair streaming
down its back. I admit that I was more
scared at this moment than when the Indians
were yelling and charging on us. Seeing
me hesitate my ghost now beckoned me to
comqe on. Approaching the object, it proved
to be old 'Granny' Parker, whom the Indians
had wounded and stripped, with the
exception of her nnder-garments. She had
made her way to the house from the fort by
crawling the entire distance. I took her
some bed-clothing and carried her some rods
from the house, made her a bed, covered her
up, and left her until we should return from
the fort. On arriving at the fort we could
not see a single human being alive, or hear
a human sound. But the dogs were barking,
the cattle lowing, horses neighing, and
the hogs equally making a hideous and
strange medley of sounds. Mrs. Parker had
told me where she had left some silver$160.50.
This I found under a hickory
bush by moonlight. Finding no one at the
fort, we returned to where I had laid
'Granny' Parker. On taking her up behind
me, we made our way back to the hiding
place in the bottom, where we found
Nixon, whom we had not seen since his
cowardly flight at the time he was rescued
by Faulkenberry from the Indians.
' In the book published by Jam9 W.
Parker, he states that Nixon liberate Mrs.
Parker from the Indians and rescued old

'Granny' Parker. Mr. Anglin in his account
contradicts or rather corrects this statement.
He says: 'I positively assert that this is a
mistake, and I am willing to be qualified to
the statement I here make, and can prove
the same by Silas Bates, now living near
Groesbeck.'
"The next morning Bates, Anglin and E.
Fanlkenberry went back to the fort to get
provisions and horses, and look after the
dead. On reaching the fort they found five
or six horses, a few saddles and some meat,
bacon and honey. Fearing an attack from
the Indians who might still be lurking
around, they left without burying the dead.
Returning to their comrades in the bottom
they all concealed themselves until they set
out for Fort Houston. Fort Houston, an
asylum, on this, as on many other occasions,
stood on what has been for many years a
farm of a wise statesman, a chivalrous soldier
and true patriot, John H. Reagan, two miles
south of Palestine.
"' After wandering around and traveling
for six days and nights, during which they
suffered much from hunger and thirst, their
clothing torn to shreds, their bodies lacerated
with briars and thorns, the women and children
with unshod and bleeding feet, the
party with James W. Parker reached Fort
Houston.
"An account of this wearisome and perilous
journey through the wilderness, given
substantially in Parker's own words, will enable
the reader to more fully realize- the
hardships they had to undergo and the dangers
they encountered. The bulk of the
party were composed of women and children,
principally the latter, and ranging from one
to twelve years old. 'We started from the
fort,' said Mr. Parker, ' the party consisting
of eighteen in all, for Fort Houston, a dis

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed October 1, 2014.