History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

fiiL3T0O r' OF i XAS.2

some fifteen years after her capture,' says
Victor M. Rose, ' a party of white hunters,
including some friends of her family, visited
tlhe Comnancle encampment, and recognizing
Cynthia Ann-probably through the mlediumi
of her naime alone-sounded her as to the
ditagreeableness of a return to her people
niid t]le haunts of civilization. Slhe slhook
hier head in a sorrowful negative, and pointed
to her little naked barbarians sporting at her
feet, and to the great, greasy, lazy buck sleeping
in the shade near at hand, the locks of a
score of scalps dangling at hlis belt, and
whose first utterance on arousing would be a
stern command to his mneek, pale-faced wife,
though, in truth, exposure to tlhe sun and air
had browned the complexion of Cynthia Ann
almost as intensely as those of the native
daughters of the plains and forest.'
" kShe retained but the vaguest remembrance
of her people-as dim and flitting as
the phantom of a dream; she was accustomed
now to the wild life she led, and found in its
repulsive features charms in which 'uppertendomrn'
woul have proven totally deficient.
' I am happily wedded,' she said to these visitors;
'I love my husband, who is good and
kind, and my little ones, who too are his, and
I cannot forsake them.'"
This incident, in all its bearings, is so
unique an one that it seems higlly warrantable
to follow Cynthia's career to the end.
About a score of years passed and young
Ross, of Waco, had seemingly silenced the
Comanches at Antelope hills and Wichita
mountains, but it was a false silence, as the
writer above quoted shows below:
"For some time after Ross' victory at
tlIe Wichita mountains the Comnanches were
less hostile, seldom penetrating far down into
the settlements. But irn 1859-'60 the condition
of the frontier was truly deplorable,

The people were obliged to stand in a continued
posture of defense, and were in continual
alarm and hazard of their lives, never
daring to stir al)roal unarmed, for small
bodies of savages, qui.k-siglhted and accustomned
to perpetual watchlfulless, hovered on
the outskirts, andl, springilg from behind
bush oir rock, surprised their enemy before lie
was aware of danger, am1l sent tidings of their
presence in tlhe fatal blow, and after execution
of tlhe bloody work, by superior knowledge
of the country and rapid movements,
safely retired to their inaccessible deserts.
"In the autumn of 1860 thle indomitable
and fearless Peta Nocona led a raiding party
of Comanches through Parker county, so
named in honor of the family of his wife,
Cynthia Ann, committing great depredations
as they passed through. The venerable Isaac
Parker was at that time a resident of Weatherford,
the county seat; and little did he
imagine that the chief of the ruthless savages
who spread desolation and death on every
side as far as their arms could reach, was the
husband of his long-lost niece, and that the
commingled blood of the murdered Parkers
and tlhe atrocious Comanche now coursed in
the veins of a second generation -bourid
equally by the ties of consanguinity to murderer
and murdered; that the son of Peta
Nocona and Cynthia Ann Parker would become
the chief of tlIe proud Comnanches,
whose boast it is that their constitutional settlement
of government is the purest democracy
ever originated or administered among
men. It certainly conserved the object of
its institution -the protection and happiness
of the people-for a longer period and much
more satisfactorily than has that of any other
Indian tribe. The Comanches claimed a
superiority over the other Texan tribes; and
they unquestionably were imore intelligent

2 ;3

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed August 30, 2014.