History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

238 Hi TOYO TX

was undaunted by the fate that awaited him,
and as he seemed to prefer death to life, I
directed the Mexican to end his misery by a
charge of buckshot from the gun which he
carried. Taking up his accontermeints, which
1 subsequently sent to G(overnor Houiston, to
b)e deposited in the archives at Austinll, we
rode back to Cynthia Ann and Kelliheir, and
found him bitterly cursing himself for having
run his pet horse so hard after an ' old
squaw.' She was very dirty, both in her
scanty garments and person. But as soon as
I looked on her face, I said: 'Why, Tom,
this is a white woman: Indians do not have
blue eyes.' On the way to the village, where
amy ien were assembling with the spoils, and
a large caballada of Indian ponies,' I discovered
an Indian boy about nine years of
age, secreted in the grass. Expecting to be
killed he began crying, but I made hi in
mount behind me and carried him along.
And when in after years I frequently proposed
to send him to his people, he steadily
refused to go, and died in McLennan county
last year.
" After camping for the night Cynthia
Ann kept crying, and thinking it was caused
from fear of death at our hands, I had the
Mexican tell her that we recognized her as
one of our own people, and would not harm
her. She said two of her boys were with her
when the fight began, and she was distressed
by the fear that they had been killed. It so
happened, however, both escaped, and one of
them, 'Quanah,' is now a chief. The other
died some years ago on the plains. I then
asked her to give me the history of her life
among the Indians, and the circumstances
attending her capture by them, which she
promptly did, in a very sensible manner.
And as the facts detailed correspn ded with
the massacre at Parker's Fort, I was im

pressed with the belief that she was Cynthia
Ann Parker. Returning to my post, I sent
her and child to the ladies at Cooper, where
she could receive the attention her situation
demanded, and at the same time dispatched
a messenger to Colonel Parker, her uncle,
near Weatherford; and as I was called to
Waco to meet Governor Houston, I left
directions for the Mexican to accompany
Colonel Parker to Cooper as interpi eter.
When he reached there hler identity was soon
discovered to Colonel Parker's entire satisfaction
and great happiness." (This battle
broke the spirit of the Comanches for Texas.)
"Upon the arrival of Colonel Parker at /
Fort Cooper interrogations were made her
through the Mexican interpreter, for she remembered
not one word of English, respecting
her identity; but she had forgotten absolutely
everything apparently at all connected
with her family or past history.
"Iin despair of being able to reach a conclusion,
Colonel Parker was about to leave
when he said, ' Tle name of my niece was
Cynthia Ann.' The sound of the once famniliar
name, doubtless the last lingering
memento of the old home at the fort, seemed
to touch a responsive chord in her nature,
when a sign of intelligence lighted up her
countenance, as memory by some mystic inspiration
resumed its-cunning as she looked
up and patting her breast, said, ' Cynthia Ann !
Cynthia Ann!' At the wakening of this
single spark of reminiscence, the sole gleam
in the mental gloom of many years, her countenance
brightened with a pleasant smile in
place of the sullen expression which habitually
characterizes the looks of an Indian restrained
of freedom. There was no longer auy
doubt as to her identity with the little girl
lost and mourned so long. It was in reality
Cynthia Ann Parker, but oh, so changed!

236

HirS TORY F ESS

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed March 30, 2015.