History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISTORY OF TEXAS. o,

4 lBut as savage-like and dark of complexion
as she was, Cynthia Ann was still dear to
lher overjoyed uncle, and was welcomed home
by relatives with all the joyous transports
with which the prodigal son was hailed upon
his miserable return to the parental roof.
" A thorough Indian in manner and looks
as if she had been so born, she sought every
opportunity to escape and had to be closely
watched for some time. IHer uncle carried
herself and child to his home, then took them
to Austin, where the secession convention
was in session. Mrs. John Henry Brown and
Mrs. N. C. Raymond interested themselves
in her, dressed her neatly, and on one occasion
took her into the gallery of the hall while the
convention was in session. They soon realized
that she was greatly alarmed by the belief
that the assemblage was a council of chiefs,
sitting in judgment on her life. Mrs. Brown
beckoned to her husband, Hon. John Henry
Brown, who was a member of the convention,
who appeared and succeeded in reassuring her
that she was among friends.
'" Gradually her mother tongue came back.
and with it occasional incidents of her childhood,
including a recognition cf the venerable
Mr. Anglin, and perhaps one or two others.
" The Civil war coming on soon after,
which necessitated the resumption of such
primitive arts, she learned to spin, weave and
perform the domestic duties. She proved
quite an adept in such work and became a very
useful member of the household. The ruling
passion of her bosom seemed to be the
maternal instinct, and cherished the hope that
when the war was concluded she would at
last succeed in reclaiming her two children,
who were still with the Indians. But it was
written otherwise and Cynthia Ann and her
little barbarians were called hence ere the
cruel war waq over. She died at her brother's

in Anderson county, Texas, in lSO0, preceded
a short time by her sprightly little daughter,
Prairie Flower. Thus ended the sad story of
a woman far-famed along the border."
Only one of her sons, Quanah, lived to
manhood. He became one of the four chiefs
of the Cohoite Comanches, who were placed
on a reservation in Indian Territory in 1874,
and became the most advanced of Comanche
tribes in the arts of civilized life. Qaanah
learned English and soon conformed to
American customs. A letter written in 1886
thus described his surroundings: "We
visited Quanah in his teepe. He is a fine
specimen of physical manhood, tall, inmuscular,
straight as an arrow, gray, look-you-straightthrough-the-eyes,
very dark skin, perfect
teeth, and heavy raven-black hair-the envy
of feminine hearts-he wears hanging in two
rolls wrapped around with red cloth. His
hair is parted in the middle; the scalp lock is
a portion of hair the size of a dollar, plaited
and tangled, signifying, 'If you want fight
you can have it.'
"< Quanah is now camped with a thousand
of his subjects at the foot of some hills near
Anadarko, Indian Territory. Their white
teepes, and the inmates dressed in their bright
blankets and ft athers, cattle grazing, children
playing, lent a weird charm to the lonely,
desolate hills, lately devastated by prairie
fire.
(t He has three squaws, his favorite being
the daughter of Yellow Bear, who met his
death by asphyxiation at Fort Worth in December
last. He said he gave seventeen
horses for her. His daughter Cynthia, named
for her grandmother, Cynthia Parker, is an inmate
of the agent's house. Quanah was
attired in a full suit of buckskin, tunic, leggins
and moccasins elaborately trimmed in
beads, and a red breech cloth with ornamental

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 30, 2014.