History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

24t HISTORY OP TEXAS.

EXEMPTIONS FROM FORCED SALE.
A homestead worth $5,000 exclusive of improvements,
if in a town or city; if in the
country, 200 acres, including improvements
and crops growing thereon, except for part or
all of the purchase money thereof, the taxes
dlne thereon, or for material used in constrncting
improvements thereon, and in this
last ea.e only when the work and material
are contracted for in writing, with the
consent of the wife given in the same manner
as is required in malkinlg a sale ald conveyance
of tile hLolilestead.
All household and kitchen furniture, and
all provision and forage on hand for home
consumption.
Any lot or lots in a cemetery for the
purpose of sepulture.
All implements of husbandry, and all
tools, apparatus and books belonging to any
trade.
The family library and all family portraits
and pictures.
Five milch cows and their calves, and two
yoke of work oxen, with necessary yokes and
chains.
One gun, two horses and one wagon, one
carriage or buggy, and all saddles, bridles,
and harness necessary for the use of the
family.
Twenty head of hogs and twenty head of
sheep.
All current wages for personal services.
TEXAS AT THE WORLD'S FAIR OF 1893.
Were it not for an implied inhibition in
the present State constitution, made ip haste
to cover more ground than was probably
intended, Texis would hive surprised the

world at the great Columbian Exposition at
Chicago with exhibits of her vast resources
and present stage of development. Possibly
she would have surpassed every other State
in the Union, if not every country in this
wide world, as a favorable section for immigration,
which she could have easily done
had it not been for that fatal clause in her
constitution and the political collisions which
it occasioned between the granger and antigranger
element of the people.
A tremendous effort was made by a few of
the most zealous friends of Texaa to have a
respectable and worthy exhibit at Chicago,
despite the obstacles just mentioned, but all
proved abortive except the iitovement inaugurated
by the two private organizations
denominated the Gentlemen's World's Fair
Association of Texas and the Texas Women's
World's Fair Exhibit Association, all the
work being devolved upon the latter, headed
by the brave and executive Mrs. Benedette
B. Tobin, of Austin, whlo was elected president
of the board of managers and took
charge of the Texas State building at the
fair. The career of the enterprise is a long
story, but remarkable from the fact that it
was successfully carried through by Southern
ladies. This was probably the greatest
undertaking by women of the South in the
history of the whole country. They succeeded
in obtaining subscriptions from various
parties in the cities and towns throughout
the State, until they raised sufficient funds to
place upon the fair grounds at Chicago the
best arranged State building there, at a final
cost of about $28,000; and it was really a
magnificent structure, even in comparison
with all the other State buildings, which
were erected under appropriations from the
respective general State treasuries. The
architect was J. Riely Gordon, of Sn

241

HIS TORY F EXS

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed September 19, 2014.