History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

252 HISTORY OP TEXAS.

W. C. Beard was reared to farm life, and
at the age of sixteen years found employment
as a clerk in Fayetteville. Three years later
he moved with his father to Mississippi,
where the Indians were still numerous, followed
freighting from Memphis a number of
years, and later conducted a grocery store in
Grenada, that State. In 1837 lie located in
Jefferson county, Texas, where he followed
farming, also boating on the Natchez river,
and the following year obtained a certificate
for a grant of land, which he located in
Williamson county. Mr. Beard moved to
this farm in 1850, where he owns 640 acres,
all now under fence, and 400 acres cultivated.
In 1839 he joined a ranging company of 370
men, commanded by Colonel Neil, and they
succeeded in driving the Indians from this
part of the country. When our subject first
located in this county he drove his ox team
to Houston for supplies, and at that time
had only about six neighbors.
In 1837 he was united in marriage with
Miss Mary J. May, who was born in North
Carolina, May 26, 1823, a daughter of Robert
B. May, a native also of that State. The
latter's father, J. May, was of Scotch descent,
held a high commission in the Revolutionary
war, and drew a pension for services rendered
in that struggle. Robert May was a
prominent farmer, served as Justice of the
Peace, and at one time was captain of a
steamboat. He moved to Mississippi when
the Indians were still there, spending the remainder
of his days in that State. Mr. and
Mrs. Beard have had fifteen children, ten of
whom grew to years of maturity, viz.: Robert,
deceased at the age of twenty-five years;
William, who died at the age of twenty
years; Rilla, wife of Benjamin St rks, a
farmer of Williamson county; Tabith , widow
of Tom Barnes; Elizabeth, deceased, was the

wife of A. Morris; Eugene, who died January
15, 1892, leaving a family; Josephine,
deceased at the age of sixteen years; John,
whose residence is unknown; Emma, wife of
C. M. Jones, a railroad agent at Granger;
and Jerufus, deceased. Two sons served in
the late war, and one was captured and held
prisoner two years at Ship island. Mr. Beard
takes an active interest in the Democratic
party, but never aspires to public office. Religiously,
his wife is a member of the Christian
church. Our subject is well and favorably
known in his community, has lived to
a ripe old age, but can still ride horseback
over his plantation, looking after the details
of his farm. He and his wife live happily
at the old homestead, in the full enjoyment
of a well-spent life.
AMUEL A. SCOTT, a prominent
pioneer of Texas was born in Alabama,
December 4, 1824, a son of Joseph
and Elizabeth (Bruce) Scott, who were born
and married in North Carolina. The father
was a son of James Scott, a native of Virginia,
who served as a private through the
Revolutionary war. Joseph Scott was a
soldier in Jackson's army during the war of
1812, and was a planter by occupation. His
death occurred in this State in 1832, his wife
surviving until 1842, and both are buried in
Washington county. Her brothers became
prominent men, and one was a celebrated
physician of Tennessee. Mr. and Mrs. Scott
were the parents of eight children, six of
whom grew to years of maturity, namely:
Phillip, who reared a large family in Burleson
county, Texas, and died in 1888; Robert
W., deceased in that county in 1880, also
raised a large family of children; Blackman,

252

-H-8-TORY P EXS

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed September 19, 2014.