History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISTORY OF TEXAS.

deceased in 1880; John W., who died of
yellow fever in Corpus Christi county, Texas,
in 1869; Samuel, our subject; and Anldrew
A., of Bee county.
Samuel A. Scott landed with his father at
tile mouth of the Brazos river, in Texas, in
March, 1831. He lived the first year in
Fort Bend county, spent six years in Washington
county, and in 1837 removed to Burleson
county, where he grew to manhood and
attended a boarding school five years. After
reaching a suitable age he embarked in the
stock business, which lbe continued until
1869, and during that time made Imany trips
with his stock to Kansas. In 1857 Mr .
Scott came to Williamson county, and the
following year bought his present farm of
320 acres, 100 acres cultivated, a part of
which he rents. He is engaged in general
farming and stock-raising. In 1861 lie
entered the State service for one year, assisted
in guarding Galveston island, and nine
months later engaged in the Confederate service.
Mr. Scott was appointed Second Lieutenant
in the State command, and after tlhe
reorganization served as Lieutenant until the
close of the struggle. The regiment disbanded
at Galveston.
In 1851 our subject was united in marriage
with Miss Mary A. Posey, who was born in
South Carolina in 1831, a daughter of James
C. and Rhoda (Evans) Posey, natives also of
that State. The father was a prominent
farmer and slave owner. Mr. and Mrs.
Scott had two children: Izora, wife of W.
M. Key, Supreme Judge of Austin; and
Samuel W., a lawyer of Haskell county,
Texas. The wife and mother died in 1863.
Mr. and Mrs. Scott have four grandchildren.
Our subject votes with the Democratic party,
was in favor of secession, but never aspires
to public office. The family are members of

the Methodlist ('hLirch. MrN. Scott ll.- ia le
his hone on the saie farm in this coaint tv
for thirty-five years, and when lie fir.t l, c:te l
liere it was only sparsely settled. Ile was
e(lucated for the practice of medicine, but
preferred agricultural pursuits and stocklraising.
He holds an enviable position in
the hearts of his acquaintances, and is especially
esteemed among his old comrades in
arms, as when canip life tried men's hearts
and patience lie was never known to speak
a harsh or unkind word.
\Wt A\ILLIAM D. WALLACE, one of the
most intelligent and successful agriculturists
of Travis county, has resided
here since March, 1867. HIe was born
in Laurens district, South Carolina, September
4, 1838, a son of Martin Wallace, a native
of the same State, born in 1810. The
father was a planter and carriage-manufacturer
of excellent business habits and sound
judgment. He was a prominent nimenmber of
the Masonic order, and built a lodge room for
the fraternity on his own plantation; this he
deeded to his brothers, with an additional
tract of land to be used as a burial ground.
He was a stanch supporter of Southern independence,
and although he was too old for
military duty cheerfully gave three sons to
the service of the Confederacy. The paternal
grandfather of our subject, Jonathan
Wallace, removed from Virginia to South
Carolina about the beginning of the nineteenth
century. He was of Scotch ancestry
and lived to the age of sixty years. He married
Elizabeth Brown and they had three
children: Martin, Wilkinson, and Mary, who
died unmarried. The wife survived her husband
only a few years. Martin Wallace

253

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed October 25, 2014.