History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

H

Virginia. In 1817 the parents removed to
Lincoln county, Tennessee, where the father
died in 1830, and the mother in 1824. During
the Revolutionary struggle every member
of this family stood in defense of the young
country against her cruel mother. The Rev.
Mr. Smith emigrated to Texas in 1851. He
was twice married: first, to the beautiful Miss
Mildred Roundtree, who died with her infant
child within two years after her marriage;
the second union was with a sister of the first
wife, Miss Nancy Roundtree, a most accomplished
and amiable woman; they lived in
peace and happiness for fifty years, and
reared a family of eight children: Lieutenant
John M. Smith died in the Confederate service
in Arkansas; two other sons are planters
in Travis county, and the fourth son is he
whose name stands at the beginning of this
biographical sketch; the four daughters are
all married to men of high standing in their
comn munities. The father was a well-known
and greatly respected man, a most efficient
clergyman of the Baptist Church; his wife,
an exemplary woman, was well fitted to be
the companion of so worthy a man, and both
lives were dedicated to the service of God, in
that they were devoted to aiding their fellowmen.

A V. DOAK, a prominent physician of
Taylor, was born in Tallahatchie county,
Mississippi, August 2, 1838, a son
of John M. and Mary A. (Rowe) Doak,
the father of Scotch-Irish descent, and the
mother a Virginian by birth, of English
family. The father was born in Tennessee,
and the name is still prominently and favorably
known in that State. He came to
Washington county, Texas, with his family
17

in 1846, and in 1859 located permanently on
what was then known as String Prairie,
Burleson county, now Lee county. AMr. Doak
and James Shaw were the mnwst prominent
pioneers of that section. The former was a
surveyor for the Austin colony, of which he
was one of the leading spirits; platted and
staked off the town of Lexington in 1850,
out of the James Shaw headright, and purchased
640 acres of that tract adjoining the
town, paying $1 per acre. At that time,
in 1849, there were not half a dozen families
on String Prairie. Mr. Doak continued to
live there until his death, in 1866.
A. V. Doak, the subject of this sketch,
attended school in Lexington, Texas, until
1857, and from that time until 1860 pursued
his studies at Lexington, Mississippi. He
then entered the medical department of the
University of Virginia. At the opening of
the late war Mr. Doak entered the C( nfederate
army, in the medical department, served
as hospital physician and surgeon at Charlotteville
and Danville, Virginia, was then
appointed Surgeon of the Twenty-fourth Virginia
Cavalry, and during the last year of the
war was Senior Surgeon of Gary's cavalry
brigade. He was surrendered by General
Lee at Appoinattox Court House, April 9,
1865. Mr. Doak was then engaged in the
practice of his chosen profession at his boyhood
home, Lexington, Lee county, Texas,
until 1879, when he went to Taylor, Williamson
county, then a small town. While in
that place he served ten years as local surgeon
of the International & Great Northern and
the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroads, his
experience of four years as an army surgeon
having well fitted himn for that position.
Dr. Doak graduated at Bellevue Hospital
Medical College, of New York, in 1873,
attended a special course at the New York

263

HISTOR Y OF TEXAS

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 28, 2014.