History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

IIS7'OIIY OF TEXAS. 2;7

who was killed in the battle of Elkhorn. Mr.
and Mrs. Miller are the parents of ten children:
Mary, wife of J. H. liobbins; J. H.,
deceased; Dee, who married Lizzie Wilson;
John T., deceased; Felix L., who married
Anne Raney; Belle, deceased; Eli; James;
Lee; and Ella.
In 1876 Mr. Miller Imet with a most painful
accident in a gin at Bluff Springs, which
resulted in the loss of his right arm. He is
an active member of Onion Creek Lodge, No.
220, A. F. & A. M. HIe also belongs to
the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which lihe
is a Steward.
tAMES H. SHAW, one of the most
prosperous agriculturists of Travis
county, dates his residence here from
November 29, 1852. He was born in Lincoln
county, Tennessee, December 16, 1821,
a son of Thomas H. Shaw, a native of Kentucky,
born in 1797. Thomas H. Shaw was
a soldier in the war of 1812, and was also
engaged in the defense of the South against
the Indians. He became a politician of local
note, serving as Sheriff for many years, and
frequently as Justice of the Peace. He adhered
to the principles of the Democratic
party, and worshiped with the Primitive
Baptists. His death occurred in 1867. His
wife, Catharine Roundtree, was a daughter
of Thomas Roundtree, of Tennessee. They
reared a family of seven children: James H.,
whose name heads this notice; William, who
died before the war; Thomas, who died in
Tennessee in February, 1892; Ann, deceased,
wife of Daniel Smart; Elizabeth. wife
of M. N. Moore; Nancy, widow of Dr. Settliff;
and Mary. James H. received only a
fair English education, but was well trained

in all the details of agriculture. He reinained
under the parental roof until h! Itad
attained his majority, andl tllen started out
in life for himself. Ile first went to Mississippi
and secured a position as overseer in
Yalobusha county, which lie retained for a
tine, but gave tip his position on account of
ill-health. He then taught school a short
time. At the end of this period he return-l;d
to Tennessee and became connected with a
mercantile establishment, of which he soon
became proprietor in partnership with his
father-in-law and brother-in-law. This business
relation continued until Mr. Shaw camile
to Texas. This journey consumed si.Ntyeight
days, and ended in Travis county,
where our subject decided to locate. Iie
bought a tract of 400 acres at the rate of
$2 50 an acre, and at once began the task of
placing it under cultivation. His crops were
grain and cotton, until a few years ago he
placed his entire farm in grass. This has
proven a judicious change and considerably
more profitable than his previous management.
He has made elegant improvements,
having erected a commodious stone residence
as early as 1871.
Mr. Shaw was united in marriage, in 1846,
to Elizabeth V. Motlow, a daughter of Felix
Motlow, who married a Miss Adkins. Mr.
and Mrs. Shaw are the parents of eight children:
John A. married Texanna Henry, and
has a family of six children; Virginia is the
wife of James Benson, of Austin; Margaret
married John Landers, and lives in San Saba
county, Texas; Thomas H. married Nannie
Blocker; Felix married Ella Matthews, deceased;
Mary Jane is the wife of J. E. Martin;
Laura is the wife of J. C. Burkett;
Daisy is unmarried.
Our subject was a soldier in the Confederate
service, being a member of Captain Car

2;7

HISFOR YOF TEXAS

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed December 27, 2014.