History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISTORY OF TEXAS. 271

McLennan county, and1 early in 1882 sold
his store and gin, came to Granger, Williamson
county, and erected a large gin and mill,
which is run by steam power, with all modern
improvements, and is said to be the best
gin in the county. He will probably make
about 2,000 bales of cotton this season. Mr.
Storrs also erected a large store building,
where he opened a fine stock of general merchandise,
and has a large and remunerative
trade. In addition to these interests, he
still owns his farm in McLennan county.
Our subject was united in marriage with
Miss A. Brown, a daughter of D. H. Brown,
a native of Illinois, who came to McLennan
county, Texas, in 1877. Mr. and Mrs.
Storrs have one child, Arthur. They are
members of the Christian Church, and our
subject also takes an interest in politics, having
served as Postmaster four years at
Rosenthal.
B. MAYES, the subject of this
< sketch, a representative of one of the
earl.-settled families of Milam county,
an old soldier with an honorable record,
and a prominent and prosperous farmer, is a
native of Greene county, Alabama, where he
was born December 12, 1838. His father was
Thomas Newton Mayes, who was born in
Union district, South Carolina, June 16,
1812, and was a son of Anthony Mayes, born
in South Carolina in 1778. Anthony Mayes,
a blacksmith and farmer by occupation,
moved from South Carolina early in the present
century, to Alabama, settling in Greene
county, where he resided for many years,
dying there in 1844. His wife, whose
maiden name wag Cynthia Otterson and
whom he married in the old State, bore him
twelve children: Lucinda, Thomas Newton,

Harvey, Bradley, Samuel, Daniel, Ruth,
Jane, Ann, Mary, James and John, all of
whomn became grown and most of whom were
married and had families. Thomas Newton
Mayes, the father of the subject of this notice,
was reared in Alabama, and moved from
there to Texas in 1853, settling in Milam
county, in the vicinity of Maysfield, which
was named for him, and there spent the remainder
of his life. He was a farmer and
stock-raiser, and, while not rich, was the possessor
of some means and passed his years in
peace and comfort. The only public functions
he ever performed were in connection
with the office of Justice of the Peace, which
preferment lie held both in Alabama and
Texas. He was for many years an active
member of the Presbyterian Church and lent
his influence to all moral and religious works.
He was three times married and was the
father of a large family of children, whom he
reared to be useful men and women. His
first marriage was to Catherine, a daughter of
Joseph Alexander, by which union he had nine
children: Cynthia Ann, who was married to
William Sharp and is now deceased; Alexander,
who died in 1862; Robert Bruce, of this
notice; David, who lives at Maysfield, Milam
county; Elizabeth, the deceased wife of
James Bradley; Daniel, who died in 1873, at
about the age of thirty years; Albert, a resident
of Milam county; James, who lives in
Wilson county, this State, and Jane, the wife
of John Hobson of Milam county. The wife
and mother died in 1858, and in 1860 Mr.
Mayes married Mrs. Eliza McKinney, widow
of William McKinney. This lady died in
1869 and he then married Mrs. Naoma Teel,
of this county. Mr. Mayes died in 1890.
Robert Bruce Mayes was a lad of fifteen
when his parents moved to Texas and settled
in Milamn county. His youth was spent in

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 23, 2014.