History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISTORY OF TEXAS. 277

county, Texas, born in 1854, and the only
child of Edward and Louisa (Jones) Van
Pelt, natives of Louisiana. At the beginning
of the late war, her father removed to Texas
and enlisted in the Confederate service, and
was killed at the battle of Donaldsonville.
He was for a number of years District Judge
and was a man of rare judgment and honor.
Mrs. Darlington's mother died when she was
an infant, and after her father died she made
her home with her maternal grandfather,
Judge Jones, of Lampasas, Texas, and later
of Travis county, where lie died in 1875,
universally lamented. Mr. and Mrs. Darlington
have six children: Edward Van Pelt,
Eunice, Lucretia, Benjamin F., Florence L.
and Loretta.
Politically, Mr. Darlington is a Democrat,
and, fraternally, affiliates with the Kniglits of
Honor, of Manor. Mrs. Darlington is an
active and useful member of the Methodist
Episcopal Church. Mr. Darlington takes a
deep interest in the welfare of his community,
to the development of which he is prompt
to contribute, and his labors and influence
have figured prominently in the attainment
of the present high standing wllicll his vicinity
enjoys.
(AMES K. QUINN.-Up to 1850 by
far tlhe greater number of immigrants
to America were natives of Ireland.
As a result of this the descendants of the
Irish became scattered throughout the country
at an early date and have exercised a
inarked influence on the history of civilization
in the western world. Some of the
most conspicuous figures in the annals of
this country have been of Irish origin.

To this class of citizens the subject of this
sketch, James K; Quinn, belongs, Ieing the
third removed from the original progenitor
of the name on this continent. He is a native
of Alabama, of which State his father,
Oliver Qninn, was also a native, born about
the year 1813. John Quinn, father of Oliver
and grandfather of James K., moved from
South Carolina to Alabama about the beginning
of this century and settled in what is
now Bibb county. lie was a planter by
occupation and in an early day a large slaveowner.
Oliver Quinn grew up in his native
county in Alabama and there passed his entire
life. He was a man of some distinction
in the locality where he lived, having served
as Sheriff of Bibb c)Junty and represented
that county in the State Legislature. His
early educational advantages were poor, there
being few schools in Alabama when he was
growing up, but he improved his opportunities
as he advanced in years, and became in
middle life a man of good general information.
He was distinguished for his knowledge
of public matters and the interest lihe
took in them, and for his liberality toward
his friends, neighbors and acquaintances. lie
was a genuine patriot in sentiment and action,
and was a humanitarian of the broadest and
most generous impulses. He possessed an
even temper, and in consequence of tllis
and the general correctness of his life his
years on earth were passel in peace. Ile
belonged to the old-school Presbyterian
Church, but was liberal in his views as respects
church polity, the practice of the virtues
and graces of the Christian religion
being with him the test of the possession of
these virtues and graces.
He was twice married; first, in 1833, to
Martha Lee, a daughter of William Lee and
a native of Alabama, and after her death to

277

HISTORY (F TEXAS

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 22, 2014.