History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISTORY OF TEXAS.

Milam county, and until 1879 engaged
ifl farming on the San Gabriel, moving
thence to the vicinity of Rockdale, and in
1887 into the town, where he now resides.
Until the date of his last removal he was engaged
actively in farming and later in the dairy
business, and still owns his farm of 348 acres
near Rockdale. He also owns property in
Rockdale and a one-fourth interest in the
cotton-yards at this place, where since 1887
lie has been the weigher.
In 1871 Mr. Perry married Miss Ada
Daniel, a native of Mississippi, and daughter
of William and Jane (Gordon) Daniel, who
moved to Texas about 1858 or '59, settling
in Williamson county. To this union four
children have been born: Emma, who died
at the age of seventeen; Andrew P., Sam
and Harry.
In politics Mr. Perry affiliates with the
Populists, being a zealous supporter of the
Alliance and kindred organizations. He and
his wife are members of the Baptist Church.
Ait 0. HORNE, the leading merchant of
Manchaca, Travis county, was born in
Lawrence county, Alabama, December
5, 1831, a son of A. 0. and Elizabeth
(Thornbrough) Horne, of German and Irish
descent. The first of the Horne family in
America came in Colonial times, settling in
Pennsylvania. The grandfather of our subject,
William Horne, was a soldier during the
seven years of the Revolutionary war, and
was married to a Miss Ogden, a member of
the family of that name since quite prominent
in this country, and a relative of Judge
Ogden, of San Antonio. The father of our
subject was born in east Tennessee, j 1793;
was married in Lawrence county, Alabama,

in 1840; removed to Illinois; shortly afterward
to Johnson county, Missouri, and in
1846 to Austin, Texas, where he lived continuously
until his death, July 1, 1876. The
mother departed this life in 1865. During
his residence in Alabama Mr. Horne was a
member of the Legislature, and, although a
licensed lawyer, never practiced his profession,
preferring to engage in educational
work, having taught school the most of his
life. He was a member of the Cumberland
Presbyterian Church. Mr. and Mrs. Horne
were the parents of ten children, seven of
whom grew to years of maturity, viz.: William
T., who died the same year as his father,
was for a number of years a physician of Austin;
James A., deceased in 1849, was also a
physician of that city; Sarah 0. married
Leander Brown, a prominent citizen of Austin,
and both are now deceased; Malcom G.,
a farmer of Hill county, Texas; Archibald,
deceased; Jonathan B., deceased; and A. O.,
the subject of this sketch.
The latter grew to manhood in Texas, and
received an ordinary Englisll education. At
the opening of the Civil war, not being a believer
in that struggle, he obtained a detail
to make salt; but in April, 1865, he joined
the Second Texas Cavalry, United States Volunteers,
at New Orleans, and served until
November, 1865. He was probably the last
man wounded in the war, having received a
ball in the thigh in the engagement at Palmetto
ranch, on Rio Grande river. This battle
occurred after the surrender of both Lee
and Johnston.
After the close of hostilities, Mr. Horne
was engaged in business for a time in Austin,
then at Prairie Lea, Caldwell county, then
spent some time in the State Comptroller's
office, and next was engaged as chief clerk in
the State Treasurer's office, until the State

284

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 6, 2015.