History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

298 HISTORY OF TEXAS.

a strong man. All the Burlesons in Aimer,
ica originated from two brothers, Sir Edward
Burleson, who located in Jewett City, Connecticut,
in 1716, and Aaron Burleson, who
settled in North Carolina in 1726. The latter's
descendants have always emigrated south
of Mason and Dixon's line, except in one or
two instances. Aaron came to find his brother
Edward, but, not being successful in his
efforts, settled in Buncombe, Mitchell county,
North Carolina. He raised seven sons and
six daughters. The former entered the Revolutionary
war, and four perished. Of the
three survivors, Thomas remained in North
Carolina; Jesse went to Mobile, Alabama;
and Aaron started to joih his intimate friend,
Daniel Boone, in Kentucky, lbut was murdered
by the Indians in crossing Clynch
river, Tennessee. He left a large family, of
whom Captain James Burleson, father of our
bsl)ject, was a member.
"Captain James Burleson was the special
and confidential commissary of General Andrew
Jackson at the battles of Horse Shoe
Bend and New Orleans. He afterward located
in Alabama, on the Tennessee river, and
owned the ferry where the Memphis and
Charleston roads now cross. Becoming involved
with the Indians at that point, the
family i;oved to Missouri, but after a few
years returned to Tennessee, locating in
Hardeman county. Fiom there they came
to Bastrop county, Texas, some in 1827 and
others in 1830-'31."
Aaron Burleson, the youngest son of the
family, was born in Alabamna, October 10,
1815. Coming to Texas with the family in
1830 or 1831, when a yotng man, he endured
all the trials and dangers of that easily
period. I-e was a brother of the noted Indian
fighter, General Edward Burles#, and was
frequently with him in his expeditions against

the red imen. He also fought bravely under
him at the capture of the Mexican army in
San Antonio, December 5, 1835, and at the
battle of San Jaeinto, April 21, 1836. In
1838 he returned to Tennessee and married
Minerva J. Seaton, who returned with him to
his home on the Colorado, through a wilderness
of 800 miles, riding the entire distance
on horseback. They settled at the month of
Walnut creek, in Travis county, where the
wife died in 1855. There were six children
of Mr. and Mrs. Burleson, viz.: John, who
enlisted in the Confederate army, was captured
at Arkansas Post, and died in the Union
prison of Camp Butler; Jefferson W., of
Manor, Texas; Nannie, now Mrs. John Taylor,
of Webberville; Vollie, wife of Edd Taylor,
of Austin; and two deceased in infancy.
May 15, 1856, Mr. Burleson married the
lady who now survives him, Miss Jane Tannehill,
a daughter of J. C. and Jane (Richardson)
Tannehill. The parents were married
in Tennessee, came to Texas in 1829, and
were members of Austin's second colony at
Bastrop, where tlhe father built the first house
in that town. Ile served in many positions
of tru-t and responsibility, and acquired the
title of Judge. They lived there until the
' runaway scrape" of 1836, and then located
in La Grange. In 1839 Mr. Tannehill settled
on his headright, which joined the city
of Austin on the east. The mother died
there in 3855 and the father in 1863. He
was a prominent member of the Masonic
fraternity. They were the parents of the
following children: Francis, who died from
wounds received at the battle of Mansfield;
Cynthia was Mrs. Joel Minors; Jesse'J., also
deceased; Jane, wife of our subject; alnd
William J., of Burnet county, Texas. Mr.
and Mrs. Burleson had six children, namely:
Edward, engaged in agricultural pursuits

298

HITO YOP TXS

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed September 21, 2014.