History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

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near Webberville; Lillie married D. B.
Matthews, also of this city, and died April
2, 1893, leaving five small children; Janie,
wife of Robert Deats; Rufus, of Webbervi lle;
Libbie, at home; and Tinnie, wife of C. W.
Hill, of Bastrop county. Aaron Burleson
died January 13, 1855, near Austin, and his
widow now makes Irer home with her children,
near Webberville. From an obituary
notice which appeared in the Austin Statesman
the following is taken:
"Aaron Burleson, one of the oldest and
best known citizens of this county, died suddenly
at his home near Govalle, some two
miles east of Austin, yesterday morning. He
was one of the purest men and best citizens
Texas ever lost. As a husband, father, citizen
and a Christian he had no superiors and
very few equals. In 1849. he and his wife
were happily converted, and, although Baptists
in sentiment, from great attachment to
the pastor, Rev. Finis E. Foster, Alford
Smith and others, they joined the Cumberland
Presbyterian Church. In 1859, imnpelled
by early conviction and mature investigation
to admit that the Baptists were right,
he bade a respectful and tender farewell to
his beloved Presbyterian brethren, and was
baptized into the fellowship of the Austin
Baptist Church by the pastor, the Rev. Woodlief
Thomas. He was ordained a Deacon in
1860, and served faithfully in that important
office twenty-five years. But to his modest,
pure and loving heart, L home was the dearest
spot on earth,' and in his home and among
his immediate neighbors his virtues shone
out most resplendently.
"His tenderness and devotion to his family,
mingled with firmness, no language can
express, and among his neighbors lie was
loved as a peacemaker. To his clear judgment,
common sense and honest, heart his

neighbors referred their difficulties, and
cheerfully accepted his advice andl decisions.
By economy and untiring industry lie accumulated
a large fortune, and made most
ample preparation for the education and coinfort
of his twelve children. Ile died suddenly,
just entering his three-score years and
ten. He had ibeen complaining for some
weeks, but felt better and rode down to his
lower plantation. On returning lie conmplained
of a severe pain in his breast, but his
family physician gave him medicine which
seemed to relieve himi entirely, and he seemed
stronger and more cheerful than for weeks.
On the fatal morning of the 13th he walked
out on his farm to look after some stock.
After walking some distance he called out,
'I feel like falling.' Thle boy caught him
and laid him on the ground, but he never
spoke. A freedman, living near by, ran for
his family and a physician. His devoted
wife and children ran to his relief. His noble
heart for the first time was unmoved by
their sobs and cries. All medical skill was
in vain. He never breathed. The doctors
pronounced it apoplexy. But the weight of
seventy winters and the ceaseless wear and
tear of seventy years on the tented field, on
the track of the bloody savage, as well as on
tlhe farm, had completely exhausted all the
powers of nature. The silver cord was loosed,
the golden bowl was broken, the pitcher at
the fountain, and the wheel at the cistern.
"Thus lived and died Aaron Burleson, a
grand type of a genuine old Texan. His
cheek never paled in the thickest of the battle,
and his heart and purse were open to the
cries of the widow and orphan. Ever ready
to live or die for his country, yet he never
sought or accepted office. He lived seventy
years amid all the bloody and exciting scenes
of frontier life without a stain, and died with

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299

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed October 20, 2014.