History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISTORY OF TEXAS.

forces, and help his country against its
enemies. He did so, and became a private
in the First Texas Cavalry, and spent much
of the time at New Orleans.
In Tippah county, Mississippi, March 18,
1846, our subject was united in marriage
with Sarah Jane Stanley. They have ten
children, namely: Mary E., deceased; William
T., deceased; Nannie, wife of W. R.
Davis, of Travis county; Martha, now Mrs.
George Heisner, also of this county; Myra,
wife of Jack Heisner; John N., deceased;
Bell Everett, of Haskell county, Texas;
Henry C., of Austin; Sidney F. and Wiley
A., of Travis county.
Mr. Nolen has been a Republican in his
political views since the war, and has been a
member of the Masonic order since 1852, in
which lie has since held many offices.
T HOMAS HERBERT WILLIAMS, deceased,
for twenty-three years a resident
of Milam county, a prominent
and prosperous farmer, was born in the
Pickens district. South Carolina, September
3,1845, and was a son of William S. and Harriet
Worthington Williams, both of whom
were also natives of South Carolina, the
father born in Anderson district in the year
1811, and the mother in Newberry district in
1816. The parents were married in 1837
and had besides the subject of this notice
three other children: Paul, who died in infancy;
Amelia W., now the wife of Alfred
Massengale of Milam county; and Fannie,
the wife of John Holcomb of Austell,
Georgia. The wife and mother died in
18.47, and the father afterward married Carrie
Feaster, by.whom he had five children: Drusie
M., Hattie M., Nellie N., now Mrs. J.
20

-I

W. Crocker, A. Erwin and Irene. The senior
Mr. Williams was for many years before
the war a prosperous merchant of P'ickens
district, South Carolina, but was broken up
by the ravages of the great conflict of 1861'65,
and about the year 1875 came to Texas
and settled in Milam county, where he died
in 1880.
Thomas Herbert Williams, the subject of
this article, was reared in Pickens district,
South Carolina, in the select schools of which
he received a good preparatory education,
and at the age of sixteen entered Pendleton
college, where he had completed something
like half of the prescribed course, when the
war opened between the States. South Carolina
being one of the most aggressive Southern
States in the secession movement, the infection
soon spread to her schools, and it was
not long until the flower of her youth were
enlisted and under arms. Young Williams
entered the Confederate service at the first
call for volunteers and served throughout the
entire struggle, taking part in all the camnpaigns
and engagements in which his comiimiand
participated. He was in thirty-two
regular engagements and was twice wounded.
Enlisting as a private, he rose to the position
of Adjutant of his regiment, which he filled
for about two years, though not regularly
corn nmissioned.
The war over and his family broken in fortune,
he came West to begin life under new
conditions, settling in Milan county, this
State, in the fall of 1866. He began his career
here literally without means, having borrowed
the money with which to pay his expenses
to the State. His first employment
was as 4 cotton picker. Shortly afterward lihe
was fortunate enough to secure a clerkship
in a store at Maysfield, where he earned remunerative
wages and acquired a knowledge

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311

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed August 27, 2014.