History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISTORY

the farm as in books, and was therefore enabled
to lend her husband most efficient aid
in the acquirement of the large estate which
he died possessed of, and which she has so
successfully managed since his death.
Mr. and Mrs. Williams were the parents
of seven children, five of whom are living:
Amelia W., Hattie E., Carrie S., Julia E.
and Virginia Kentucky.
Mr. Williams is spoken of by those wlho
knew him long and intimately in terms of
great respect. All agree in saying that he
was kind and accommodating to his neighbors,
steadfast in his friendships and devoted
unreservedly to his family. He was not only
moral but religious, and endeavored so far
as lie could to make his life an acceptable
fulfillmeLt of the golden rule. His death
was a genuine loss to the community in
which he lived, and was sincerely 'mourned
by his many friends and acquaintances. In
personal appearance he possessed a somewhat
striking figure, being full six feet in height,
and weighing about 115 pounds, being very
erect and of a good carriage, had dark hair,
large gray eyes and a. calm, untroubled countenance.
No ilman ever grasped his hand and
met the steady glance of his eye without being
impressed with his personality, and no
one was ever under his roof without being
touched by the mellowest virtues of his race
-simple, unsparing human kindness and
hospitality.
He died February 28, 1890, and was bur..
ied at Little River church, Milam county.
J AMES WOOD is one of the few remaining
members of the " Old Guard " who
have through many years of storm and
sunshine cultivated the rich fields about

OF TEXAS. 313
Webberville. They have watched the little
town grow from a single house and store to
a thriving trading point, doing more business
than even the capital city, but lost its
prestige on account of being snubbed by the
railroad. Mr. Wood is a son of William and
Nancy (Simms) Wood. This family have
been tillers of the soil for many generations.
The father was born and raised in Georgia,
and after marriage located in Madison county,
Alabama, where his children were also
raised. Mr. and Mrs. Wood raised tllhe
following family: Andrew J., Samintha,
William, Thomas, Bettie, Kittie, James, Polly
and Nancy. All are now deceased but the,
subject of this sketch. The eldest son, Andrew
J., was named after the famous president,
who in his "fighting" days often stopped
at the Wood home. The mother of these
children died in Alabama, in 1849, and the
father afterward started to come to our subject's
home in Texas, but died at Houston,
while en route.
James Wood was born in Madison county,
Alabama, on Christmas day, 1831. At the
age of eighteen years, in company with his
brother William and several neighbor boys,
he started overland to Texas. The party llad
but one wagon, which was heavily loaded,
and it was necessary for all but the driver to
walk, and thus Mr. Wood literally walked
to Texas. November 7, 1849, they landed
at Webber's prairie, and Mr. Wood immediately
rented the twenty-five acres now forming
the southeastern corner of his present
farm, where lie made his first crop, receiving
fifty bushels of corn to the acre. He continued
to rent land for a number of years,
but, as success attended his efforts, he purchased
property, and now owns 510 acres,
making one of the finest farms in Colorado
valley. He has 250 acres of his place under a

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed December 20, 2014.