History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

LB ~TR FTXS

a rush upon the settlement and sacked the
small store and post office, appropriating the
ready-made clothing, which they donned in
a most grotesque fashion. A running fight
ensued in which the marauders were handled
in a severe manner, and met with a heavy
loss. At another time Mr. Moore, with three
companions, was coming out from Austin
toward Webberville, and came suddenly upon
a small band of Indians who had in captivity
a little fellow named Colman. The four
brave men made a desperate assault upon
the redskins and released the prisoner, with
only the loss of Mr. Moore's horse. Attacks
from the Indians were almost of daily occurrence,
and the settlers were - not safe from
the arrows of their hostile neighbors even in
their own door-yards.
After living in constant watchfulness of
the Indians for a period of fourteen years,
another trouble came up of an equally serious
nature. By this time Texas had several settlements
of civilized people, and by their
thrift and energy had excited the jealousy of
the Mexican government, who imposed burdens
in the way of taxation that were unbearable,
and upon the people's refusal to
submit to this exorbitant taxation the Mexicans
declared war, giving their officers instructions
to exterminate the American settlers,
in which some bloody butchery took
place; but the decisive battle of San Jacinto
took place April 21, 1836, which gained for
Texas her independence, and she formed an
independent republic.
April 21, 1839, Mr. Moore participated in
the Battle creek fight, in which he lost his
horse and came near being captured.
It were such sturdy pioneers as Mr. Moore
who had the courage to come to this wild
and barren country and subdue the sa ages
and Mexicans, and lay the foundation 1br the

greatest and most fertile agricultural State
in the Union, and the posterity of these men
are now enjoying the peaceful and cultured
homes made possible by the hardships and
privations of these first settlers.
It must not be imagined that the pioneers
were without amusements, and, as now, one
of the principal sources of recreation was
that of horse-racing; and Mr. Moore was an
ardent lover of this sport, and always kept a
number of these valuable animals. At times
the purses were worth a trial. As early as
1849 Mr. Moore won a purse of $2,000, and
his horse was ridden by our subject. It was
among these wild surroundings that Mr.
Moore passed his life and accumulated a
large estate, having at the time of his death
several thousand acres of Travis and Williamson
counties' best soil, which increased rapidly
in value as the country settled up.
His wife, whose name before marriage
was Mary Williams, bore him eight children:
Robert J., Rebecca Ann, Nancy E., Mary L.,
Nathaniel J., Thomas W., Sarah Jane and
Maggie S. He departed this life in April,
1852, and his wife died April 10, 1884.
Robert J. Moore, our subject, was born in
a tent under a live-oak tree on Gilliland's
creek, about eight miles from where Webberville
now stands, September 23, 1833; is
the oldest son and child of the above, and is
one of the oldest native-born white citizens
of Travis county. During his boyhood days
there were but few settlers in the county and
educational facilities were almost unknown.
He was reared to the life of farming and
stock-raising, and resided with his parents
until he was twenty years old, when he began
business for himself, engaging in agricultural
pursuits.
In 1854 he went to Lampasas county, following,
as had his ancestors, the frontier,

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HISTORO~ Y O EXS

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed May 5, 2015.