History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

ISTOR Y OF TEXAS.

of Texas during the war of 1846, served
throughout the struggle as a private, was in
many hard-fought battles, and was once
wounded by an Indian in the right hand.
He served only as a home guard during the
late war. From 1855 to 1860 Mr. Seiders
was engaged in the mercantile business in
connection with farming, but during the
war devoted his attention entirely to agricultural
pursuits and stock-raising. He
opened the first farm of any size in that portion
of Travis county. Mr. Seiders resided
within two miles of Austin from 1847 until
his death, in June, 1892, at the age of
eighty years. His wife died in 1833, at the
age of twenty-six years. Both were members
of the old-school Presbyterian Church.
Mr. and Mrs. Seiders had three sons,-Edward,
now in Kansas City; Henry B., our
subject; Pinkney W., a resident of Austin.
In 1858 the father was united in marriage
with Miss Lettie Lewis, a native of Texas.
They had five children,-John W., Jefferson
D., Robert, Arthur and Fred. Mrs. Seiders
still survives,. and resides at the old homnesttad.

The maternal grandfather of our subject,
Gideon White, was one of the very early settlers
of Texas. He was noted for his perseverance,
indomitable will and bravery in
battle. He served in many Indian campaigns,
was Captain of the citizen soldiers;
anrd lost his life by the savages. Mr. White
had taken his gun about sundown and started
to get his cattle, but while on Shoal creek,
two and a half miles above where Austin
now stands, and while nearing some live-oak
trees, lie was attacked by three Indians. He
was shot through the thigh and dropped to
the ground, and the Indians, thinking he
was dead, started for his scalp. Mr. White
raised hiniself to a sitting position, fired, and

killed one savage. The remaining two
crowded nearer, but Mr. White succeeded in
killing another with the stock of his gun.
The father of our subject, Edward Sei(lers,
heard the firing, and started for the seat of
trouble, but as lie drew near saw the third
Indian running away, after having killed and
scalped Mr. White. At the time of his
death he was probably one of the best known
men in that section of the State. He was a
prominent farmer and stock-raiser and a
large slave-owner. Mr. and Mrs. White had
five daughters, all now deceased, namely:
Mrs. Seiders, Mrs. Judge Fisk, Mrs. Enochl
Johnson, Mrs. Martin Moore, and iMrs.
Thompson.
H. B. Seiders, the subject of this sketch,
received his education in the city of Austin.
At the age of twenty-three years lie began
contracting in railroad work, his first contract
having been on the Houston & Texas
Central Railroad, in 1872. lHe next engaged
in quarrying rock in Austin for the courthouse,
post-office building, Hancock building,
Catllolic church, Jewish synagogue, and
many other prominent buildings. He also
furnished the fire-wood for all of the State
buildings, etc. In 1880 Mr. Seiders left
Austin for Laredo, Texas, where lie built
seventeen miles of road for the International
& Great Northern Railroad Company. IlHe
next returned to Austin, and in 1882 moved
to Trinity Station, on the International &
Great Northern road, where he had a contract
for grading the Trinity & Sabine
Railroad, a branch of the Missouri, Kansas
& Texas road. During the same year he
built two miles of road for the East Texas
& Sabine Railway Company, in 1882 began
work for the Texas & Southern Railroad;
July 8, 1883, opened a yard and feed store
in Taylor, two years later began the livery

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed September 4, 2015.