History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

_~~~~~~~Uso1i OF TEXA. i

the colony disposed to complain and make
trouble. In the United States and Europe
the impression began to prevail that Austin's
early colonists were in great part fugitives
from justice; but he maintained, with every
show of fact and reason, that his colony was
as moral as any community in the States.
The limits of the county were undefined b)y
the law, and the immigrants were allowed to
settle at various distances from the center according
to their own free will. In response
to Austin's petition, the government allowed
him to introduce 500 more families to
locate upon the unoccupied lands lying between
the tracts already occupied by his
colonists.
Mr. Austin at one time sent a newcomer
to Texas from San Felipe to the Colorado to
take the census of the families in that part of
his colony. The duty being performed, the
messenger returned, and the following conversation
occurred:
Austin.-" Well, Mr. , how do you
like that part of the country?"
Newcomer.-" I like the country much;
but I wouldn't live in such a community if
you would give it all to me."
Austin.-" Why, didn't they treat you
well?"
Newcomer.-" Yes, indeed; never was better
treated."
Austin.-" Tell me about it."
Newcomer.-" Well, general, to give you a
sample of the people living up there. I went
to a log cabin, where I found only a lady at
home. I asked her who lived there. She
said, 'Me and the old man.' 1 told her I had
come to take the census. She told me to take
it. I said to her, ' Have you any children?'
She replied, 'Yes; lots on 'em.' 'Please give
their names, madam.' 'Well, thar's Isaiah,
and Bill, and Ton, and Jake, and Ed, and John

and Bud, and -- , oh, yes! I'd like to forgot
Joe, he's gone so much.' These being duly
noted, with ages, I asked, 'Have yon no
girls?' 'No, sir,' replied she, emphatically;
'boys is trouble enough; but arter a while
they kin take care of themselves; but gals is
always trouble, and never kin take care of
themnselve..' General, those people are too
rough to live with."
Austin.--" Well, Mr. --- , those are exactly
the people we want for the pioneers on
our frontier. They are hardy, honest and
brave. They are not your kid-glove sort. As
the settlement becomes denser, they will strike
farther out upon the borders. I wish we ha I
more of. them."
The following anecdote, in regard to meimbers
of the colony, illustrates the universal
tendency of retaliatory measures to increase
in gravity far beyond reason. In February,
1841, a pig belonging to Mr. Bullock, an
Austin landlord, found his way into the stable
of M. de Saligny, the French charge, and ate
some of the corn. For this offense a servant
of the Frenchman slew the little animal, and
in return for this the irate landlord horsewhipped
the servant. Thereupon Saligny
complained, and Bullock was arrested and
bound over to the next term of court. Afterward
the landlord ordered the envoy off his
premises. These indignities to French honor
were not to be passed unnoticed by, and the
Texas government, failing to give satisfaction,
the French minister abandoned his post.
A conciliatory letter from President Ilouston
subsequently healed the breach and brought
the testy Frenchman back. Occasions as
trifling as this have. in the history of man,
been the initial point of a series of acts which
terminated in war.
'" The character of' Leather-stocking.'" says
Mrs. Holley, "is not uncommon in Texas.

3

AISTORY OF TEAS.

a

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed September 2, 2014.