History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

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subject; Mollie, widow of C. L. Fowzer, of
Taylor; Virgil, also of Williamson county;
May E., wife of T. C. Wilson; and one deceased
when young. Mr. and Mrs. Simons
had two children: Vernon A. and Mattie D.,
both at home. The wife and mother died in
October, 1876. She was a member of the
Christian Church from girlhood. In 1881
Mr. Simons married Miss Mattie C. Townes,
a native of Travis county, and a daughter of
Judge E. D. and M. Cousin (Betts) Townes,
natives of Alabama. Mr. and Mrs. Simons
have four children: Dick T., James A., IRuth
and Robert V. Our subject and wife are
members of the Christian Church, and the
former also affiliates with the A. F. & A. M.,
Solomon Lodge, No. 484, and with the R. A.
M., No. 189. He is a Democrat in his political
views, and has served several terms as
Alderman of Taylor.
Eggleston D. Townes, father of Mr. Simons,
was born in Virginia, a son of John Townes,
a minister of the Baptist Church. He moved
to Alabama when E. D. was only a child,
where the latter grew to years of maturity.
He graduated in a college course and studied
law when a young man; was at one time Circuit
Judge, and for many years was Superior
Judge of the State of Alabama. In 1858,
on account of ill health, he resigned his position
and came overland to Texas, consuming
about six weeks in making the trip. He
brought with him about ninety slaves, and
opened a large farm in Travis county, where
he was one of the leading men for many years.
He also served in the State Legislature. During
the early portion of the late war Judge
Townes was opposed to secession, but he
afterward cast his fortune with his country,
and fully espoused the cause of the South.
He was Major of a regiment, but before the
close of the war was taken sick and conveyed

homIe in a wagon. Hie never recovered from
this sickness, and his death occurred ill 1805,
never having been out of the house from
1864, the time of his coming home, until his
death.
The Judge was one of the most benevolent
and upright men of his section, was lnuch
beloved by his family and friends, and deeply
mourned by the entire community. Hle was
a stanch member of the Baptist Church. His
wife, nee Mllartha Cousins Betts, was a daughter
of William and Martha C. (Chambers)
Betts, natives of Virginia. The father moved
from Virginia to Alabama at about the same
time the Townes family came to Texas. lie
was a prominent planter and slave-owner.
Mr. and Mrs. Townes had six children,
namely: Julia, deceased; Virginia, widow of
Robert Rlibb, and a resident of Taylor; Mary,
wife of Dr. R. S. Gregg, of Manor, Texas;
Judge John C., a member of the firm of
Fisher & Townes, of Austin; Mattie C., wife
of our subject; and Henry E., of Georgetown,
Texas.
TARK WASHIINGTON, one of the
successful business men of Travis
county, was born in the house he still
occupies, February 3, 1853, a son of Colonel
T. P. Washington. The latter was a son of
Henry Washington, who was a cousin of
Bushrod Washington, a Justice of the Supreme
Court and a brother of Colonel William
Washington, who commanded the dragoons
at the battle of Cowpens during the
Revolutionary war. Henry and William
were sons of a half brother of General George
Washington, immortal in American hearts.
Our subject's branch of the family lived in
Virginia until after the war, when his grandfather
moved to Shelbyville, Kentucky, and

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HISTORY OF TEXAS..

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed April 19, 2015.