History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

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lives in this county; Jennie is the wife of T.
A. Porter, of Big Springs, Howard county,
this State; William Horace died in this
county some years ago; Mattie is the wife of
W. A. Barclay, of Temple, Texas; Ada is
the deceased wife of E. iM. Scarbrough, of
Austin; and Ida is the wife of Dr. E. J.
Powell, of Maysfield, this county.
Mr. and Mrs. Wilson have never had any
children of their own, but have raised and
educated five. They reside upon their farm,
which adjoins the old Wilson homestead
about three and a balf or four miles southwest
of Cameron, where they have made
their home for thirty-three years. They
have a pleasant place and a valuable one,
consisting of about 3,000 acres. Their residence
is a typical old-style farm mansion,large,
commodious and complete in its appointments
as a country place, surrounded
by spacious grounds, well cultivated fields,
and open woodlands, the latter being maintained
in all their original beauty and picturesqueness.
Blessed with plenty, health,.
friends and the retrospect of long lives filled
with deeds of usefulness and kindness, they
could hardly be more happily situated to
spend their declining years.
'AMES JACKSON, a successful farmer
I of Milam county, is a son of David
Jackson. who was born in South Carolina.
The latter's father, Edward Jackson,
was also a native of South Carolina, a farmer
by occupation, and a soldier in the Revolutionary
war. As far back as is known the
Jackson family came from South Carolina.
David Jackson moved from his native State
to Georgia, and in 1852 to Texas. He was
living with our subject in Parker county, this

State, at the time of his death, in 1873. lIe
was a prominent and successful farmer, a
Whig in his political views, and a member of
the Baptist Church. The mother of our subject,
nee Rachel Brecken, was born and raised
in Georgia. a daughter of James Brecken,
natives also of that State. Mr. and Mrs.
David Jackson were married in 1820, and
were the parents of nine children, viz.: Lydia,
deceased, was the wife of William Myers,
also deceased; Nancy, widow of Alston Mills;
William, deceased; Jamies, the subject of
this sketch, Judie married James Parton,
and both are now deceased; Edward, who was
killed at the second battle of Manassas, in the
Confederate army; Elizabeth, deceased, was
the wife of Clark Wieins, who was also
killed while in the Confederate service; John,
deceased, and the youngest child died in infancy.

James Jackson was born in Georgia, June
5, 1825, where he remained until 1851. IIe
then spent two years in Bosque county, Texas,
and next, in company with his father, purchased
738 acres of land in Parker county.
Five years later, in 1858, lie located in the
northwestern part of Johnson county, and
while there enlisted in the Confederate service,
entering the Third Texas Cavalry, under
Colonel Sweet, of San Antonio, and Captain
Calfee. After four months of service Mr.
Jackson was released by the conscript act,
but afterward re-entered the army at Dallas,
as wagon master, and served until the close
of the struggle. He then started on the
journey to Mexico, but after reaching Travis
county bought teams, and began freighting
from Brenham, Columbus, Fort Lavaca and
Indianola to the Government post of Jacksborough,
continuing that occupation about
six years. In 1875 Mr. Jackson settled on
the place where he still resides, and for the

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HISTORY F EXS

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 31, 2014.