History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

3 - HITR OFTXS

nition and other supplies from Mexico to the
Brasos river. He was twice sworn into the
Confederate service, first into the company
commanded by Captain ", Wash" Hill of Austin,
and secondly into that of Captain Petty
of Bastrop; but neither of these companies
was mustered into the regular service as they
were then organized. When the news of the
surrender reached Mr. McLaren he was en-'
gaged in transporting bacon from Mexico to
the Brazos river; he yielded readily to the
inevitable, And resumed his agricultural pursuits
in Travis county. IHe located in Williamson
county for the purpose of improving
a portion of the Moore league, to which his
son was heir, and this he Ihas well-stocked
with both cattle and sheep. He is giving
especial attention to the finer grades of aniihals,
and has done much to elevate the standard
in this section. In his flock it is a common
occurrence to find an animal that will
shear twelve and a quarter pounds, and he
has one fine buck that yields a fleece of thirty-three
and a quarter pounds. His total
clip from 800 head averages 6,000 pounds
annually.
Politically Mr. McLaren is of the Democratic
persuasion, but his interest in public
affairs extends scarcely beyond the exercise of
his right of franchise.
G. W. McLaren, the father of R. C., was
born in Laurens county, South Carolina, in
1801. He was very successful in business,
following agricultural pursuits; he was a
finished scholar, having secured a thorough
education at West Point, Tennessee; he was
a forcible speaker, possessed the courage of
his convictions, and his opinions in the counsels
of his party were considered of great
value. He was solicited time and again to
become the Democratic candidate for /ongress,
but steadily refused. He died daring

the Civil war, without military record. His
father, John McLaren, was a native of South
Carolina; he emigrated to Tennessee early in
the present century, and served as a soldier
in the war of 1812; he died about the year
184:5. His wife, Miss Makemson, was of
Irish descent, and one of a family of twelve
daughters; the sons and daughters of this
union were: Daniel, John, Robert, Polly,
G. W., James and Betsey. G. W. McLaren
married Sophia Beck, a daughter of John
Beck and one of the following named children;
Orrin, Jeffrey, Aaron, William, Fannie,
Meddie, who was the mother of General
N. B. Forrest; and Sophia. The children of
G. W. McLaren and wife were: Mary, who
married Z. B. Crook; M. E., who married
Miss Gilliland; John, who died in early life;
William, who wedded Miss Parker; R. C.,
the subject of this notice; George W., who
married Miss Gober, died while serving in
the army; Frank, who died in the army;
Aaron, who died in Tennessee; Lee, who died
in Palo Pinto county, Texas; James K. P.,
who is engaged in the cattle business in
Texas. R. C. McLaren married Ann Moore,
a daughter of T. A. Moore; three children
have been born to them: Laura (deceased),
wife of W. T. Brown (see sketch); Willie
(deceased), and Frank, who resides with his
father.
RS. EMELINE N. SNIVELY, wife
of H. F. Snively, of Rockdale, comes
of one of the historic families of Texas,
being a daughter of Patterson Rogers,
who together with his eldest son met a tragic
death in one of the thrilling episodes not uncommon
in the early history of the State.
Patterson Rogers started with his family

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RISTORY F EXS

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed August 1, 2014.