History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

)IISTORY O-~~I' T ES4

There he grew to manhood and married
Asenia, daughter of John Dunmas. Mr.
Woodall followed farming during his lifetime
and was fairly successful, and died in
his native State in 1858. Our subject's
paternal grandfather was Robert Woodall.
He was a planter, and, like his son, Jefferson,
had no political or military record. He
married Mary Miller, and was the father of
six children, two of whom are now living.
Mr. Woodall died in 1875. Our subject's
maternal grandfather, John Dumas, married
Matilda Kolb, and became the father of Elizabeth,
who married Joseph Slade of Louisiana;
Ann became the wife of John W. [ard; she
is now deceased; Jerry, deceased; and Asenia,
our subject's mother. Mr. Dumas was married
first to Hannah Gorden, by whom lihe
had Nancy, now deceased, who married William
Harrison; Helen deceased, who married
Newton Samples; Sarah, deceased, who married
John Harvey; Edmrnond; Martha, deceased,
who married William Brewington;
Temperance, who married John D. Holloway;
and John C. Dumas, deceased.
From the union of Jefferson P. Woodall
and Asenia Dumas two children were born,
namely: Mary, wife of James M. Eaves,
and residing in Burnet county, Texas, and
John R., our subject. After the death of
Jefferson P. Woodall, his widow married
L. P. Eaves, now of Wilderville, Falls county.
Of this marriage one child is living, Minnie.
John R. Woodall was raised in Georgia and
received in youth the elements of a common
English education. At the age of seventeen
he was thrown own his own resources and in
the fall of 1875 he came to Texas, locating in
Milamn county, where he engaged in farming
on rented land. He then assumed the engagement
and control of the 500-acre tract belonging
to W. J. Brewington on the Brazos

bottom, 350 of which is in cultivation and
upon which 130 bales of cotton were grown
in 1891 and about tlhe same number int 1892.
A gin and small mercantile business is conducted
in connection with the management
of this farm. Mr. Woodall owns a farm of
359 acres lying on the Brazos river, 175
acres of which is in cultivation. lie owns
a gin and does a good business with this
during the ginning season.
Mr. Woodall married in 1869 Miss Ida,
the daughter of Dr. C. C. Briggs of New
York, who married Miss Sarah Oakley and
had only one child. Mr. and Mrs. Briggs
are now living in Alabama. The children
of Mr. and Mrs. Woodall are: Carey, Richard,
Dumnas, deceased and Goldy. In personal
appearance, Mr. Woodall is of medium
height, of muscular frame, and of large
proportions. As all men of considerable
avoirdupois, he is of a pleasant and affable
temper, making his com panionship agreeable
and entertaining.
In politics Mr. Woodall is a Democrat,
and a leader in local matters.
B LOEWENSTEIN & BRO.-Perhaps
no single case better illustrates tile
phenomenal commercial growth of the
towns of Milam county during the last
twenty years than does that of B. Loewenstein
& Bro., of Rockdale, a firm that enjoys
the distinction of being one of the
pioneers of that place and one of the first in
commercial strength in the county. They
have been in business'in Rockdale just twenty
years, having opened their first stock of goods
here December 24, 1873. That was before
the International & Great Northern Railroad
had reached this place, and when the town of
- ; /'f

HISTOR Y OF TEXAS.

54:l

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed June 30, 2015.