History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISTORY OF TEXAS. .JX)

200 bales of cotton annually and grain and
stock products in proportion. His farm lies
in the Little river and Brazos bottoms and is
one of the best places in the eastern part of
the county.
With the exception of the office of Justice
of the Peace, which Captain Thompson filled
for eight years in Alabama, he has never held
any public position, preferring the peaceful
ways of private life to the business of officeseeking
and office-holding. In politics he is
a Democrat, stanch in his support of the
principles of the party and loyal to its nominees.
In 1852 he became a member of the
Masonic fraternity and has held a membership
in that order since. He lus been a
member of the Methodist Church for fifty
years, and in accordance with his means a
liberal contributor to all charitable work.
In September, 1847, Captain Thompson
married Miss Ariana S. A. Ghent, a daughter
of Daniel Ghent and a native of South Carolina.
The issue of this marriage has been
eight children: Robert Daniel, who married
Nellie Leopard and resides in Milam county;
Nancy, who was married to William Self and
resides in this county; Thomas L., of Fort
Bend county, Texas; Sallie, who is the wife
of A. E. Brady, of Milam county; Fannie,
who is the wife of Dr. M. Cawthon, of
Eddy, Texas; Lizzie Viola, who died at the
age of fourteen; Lena A. and Laura A.
ILLIAM WINFLELD SCOTT
TYSON, a farmer of Milam county,
residing near Maysfield, was
born in Montgomery county, Tennessee,
April 21, 1850, and is a son of John E.
Tyson, who was born in the same county
in 1825. The latter's father, Uriah Tyson,

was born in North Carolina in 1787. The
family are of Welsh descent, and its earliest
representatives came to Amnerica in anteRevolutionary
days, settling in Virginia, but
afterward emigrated to North Carolina. In
his young manhood Uriahl Tyson moved to
]Montgomery county, Tennessee, early in this
century, driving the "safety" of the eighteenth
century, the ox and cart. He married
AMary Barber, and they had seven children:
Wright, James, Noah, William, Marshall,
John E. and Mary. Mrs. Tyson died in
1849, at tile age of sixty-one years.
John E. Tyson, the father of our subject.
was reared a farmer boy, was fairly well el'.cated,
and engaged in the calling taught him
in youth. He was a prominent slave-owner,
was a leader in his community, and was
much interested in the promotion of worthy
and laudable enterprises. Both the church
and school were recipients of his benefactions.
He was a member of the Masonic,
fraternity, and became greatly interested in
the workings and success of the order. Mr.
Tyson came to Texas in 1853, floating down
the Cumberland river to the Ohio, then by the
Mississippi river to the Gulf, by steamer to
the mouth of the Brazos river, and up this
by a smaller vessel to old Port Sullivan. A
farm was immediately purchased, on which
he settled and where he continued to reside
until death, in 1880. lIe gave three years
of his life to good, hard, faithful service in
the Confederate army, enlisting in Colonel
Duff's regiment in 1862, and served on
frontier and coast defense. In politics he
affiliated with the Democratic party, but lihe
was never a solicitor of public favors, and
never held but one elective office, that being
County Commissioner of Milam county.
Mr. Tyson married Martha S., a daughter
of Isaac and Wilnmouth (Noland) Sparks, of

HITO YOF TXS

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed September 20, 2014.