History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

A
356

356 HISTORY OF' TEXAS.

Cacroll county, west Tennessee. Mr. and
Mrs. Sparks were the parents of eight children,
viz.: Bailey; Jesse; Mary, wife of
Ambrose Harmon: Sallie, who married Samnel
Tyson; Martha, wife of John E. Tyson;
Isaac H.; Wilmouth, wife of Ambrose
Mitchell; and Mahala, who married D. M.
Smith. Mr. and Mrs. Tyson had seven
children, namely: Lenora, who died at the
age of two years; William Winfield Scott,
our subject; Mary, who died at two years of
age; Angeline, who died aged ten; John B.,
who died aged three; James E., who lives in
Cameron; and Martha B., who died at the
age of seventeen.
W. W. S. Tyson attended school when the
labors of the farm did not demand his attention,
and at the age of twenty-two years embarked
in agricultural pursuits on his own
responsibility. He rented land the first year,
the following year purchased 150 acres, and
eight years later bought a tract near where
he now resides. He remained on the latter
place until the death of his father, when the
interest of the other heirs in the old homestead
was secured, when he made his final
move. Mr. Tyson now owns 300 acres of
land, 180 acres of which is cultivated. In
1891 he raised seventy-five bales of cotton
on his place, and in 1892, sixty bales. He is
specially interested in the raising of fine
horses, cattle and hogs. Politically, he affiiliates
with the Democratic party, and has been
appointed a delegate to various county and
district conventions and has always taken
an active interest the politics of county and
State.
In 1873 Mr. Tyson married Cornelia, a
daughter of George W. Murphy, of Virginia.
Mr. and Mrs. Murphy were the parents of
six children: Charles E., deceased; Mary,
wife of Henry Faulk; Emma, deceased, mar

ried C. L. Butts; Cornelia, wife of Mr.
Tyson; James E., deceased; Eugenia Florence,
deceased; and Pauline, who died in infancy.
Our subject and wife have had the
following children, namely: John William,
George W.; and Joe S., deceased; Ola Wilmouth;
Charles E.; Zula B.; Hall C.; Emma
C., and an infant. The family are members
of the Methodist Church, in which Mr.
Tyson is a Steward and Trustee.
i ICHAEL T. FOWLER.-In 1874, a
young man from Travis county,
Texas, entered upon the study of law
in the office of his uncle, Colonel M.
Thompson, in Washington, District of Columbia.
It took him but two months to find
that the practice of law was not his calling,
and one morning he announced his intention
of starting home the following evening.
Recollecting thatjhe had not yet seen the
President, he asked his preceptor how he
would obtain an audience. The gentleman
replied that it would be impossible to meet
the President, as it was Cabinet day, and
visitors were not received. The young man
determined, however, to see what Western
assurance would accomplish, and made his
way to the White House. Confronted by a
policeman, he stated his errand, and soon was
ushered into the office of General Babcock,
the President's private secretary, who also
said that the President could not be seen,
as the Cabinet was in session. The young
man urged his case, however, and succeeded
in getting the secretary to prefer his request.
Five minutes of waiting, and he was introduced
to President Grant, who laughed at
the young man's persistency, and chatted
with him pleasantly about his Western home.

HIS~15TORY F EXS

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed May 4, 2015.