History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

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864

64 HISTORY OFTEXA

sepl, Eakens, of Lauderdale county, Mississippi;
Margaret, who was married to Absalom
Burton and lived in Kemper county,
Mississippi; Mary, who was married to George
Calvert and lives in Kemper county, Mississippi;
John, who resides in Lauderdale county,
Mississippi; David, who was killed at the
battle of Nashville, Tennessee, in 1864, in
the Confederate army; Joseph P., the subject;
and Charles, who died at the age of
five years.
Joseph P. Greenlees was born in Sumter
county, Alabama, December 9, 1838. He
was raised in that county and received the
rudiments of a common English education in
the schools of the same.
In April, 1861, he entered the Confederate
army, enlisting in Company E, Captain Robert
Blount, Fifth Alabama Infantry, comnmanded
by Colonel R. S. Rhodes. Being
mustered in at Pensacola, Florida, he went
with his command to the army then forming
in Virginia. He was at the first battle of
Bull Run, his command reaching the field in
time to throw a few shells and witness the
rout that has rendered that engagement
famous in the history of the late war. Falling
back from Bull Run under Early, he
missed the Seven Pines fight, where he was
on detail duty. He took part in the engagements
at Gaines' Mill, and Malvern Hill cf
the Seven Days' fight. His command was
left at Hanover Junction to watch Burnside,
and did not join Lee until after the second
Manassas. Entering the Maryland campaign,
Mr. Greenlees was in the engagements at
Boonesboro mountains, and later at Sharpsburg.
He missed the engagement at Antietam,
but rejoined his command and took
part in the battles of Chancellorsvjlle and
Gettysburg. In the last named engagement
he lost his right arm and was disabled from

further service. Being left on the field, he
was taken prisoner by the Federals and held
in field hospital about two weeks, when he
was transferred to Baltimore and thence to
David's island, New York, where he was
kept in prison till September 16, 1863. At
that date he was exchanged at Akins Landing'on
James river and returned home.
In the fall of 1865 Mr. Greenlees left Alabama
and went to Mississippi, locating in
Lauderdale county, where he held the position
of Deputy Sheriff for three years. Entering
a commercial college at New Orleans,
at the end of this time he took a commercial
course, and later embarked in the insurance
business, which he followed in Mississippi,
Louisiana and Arkansas for four years. In
1873 he came to Texas, and, settling at Waco,
continued in the same line for about four
years. Having married, he settled on a farm
on the edge of the Brazos bottom, in Milam
county, and here lie has since resided, and has
been actively engaged in agricultural pursuits.
March 18, 1877, Mr. Greenlees married Mrs.
Sallie Stoneham, widow of Henry B. Stoneham,
a daughter of Grey and Elizabeth Manning,
who were natives of Florida. Mrs.
Greenlees' parents emigrated from their native
State to Butler county, Alabama, soon
after marriage. They subsequently moved
to Clark county, Arkansas, and came thence
to Texas. The father lost his life by accident
in Milam county whiie on a visit here.
His family, consisting of his widow and four
children, shortly afterward moved to Texas.
Mrs. Manning died in Calvert, Robertson
county, in 1884. The father and mother
were members of the Baptist Church. The
stock from which they descended was of
Scotch-Irish origin, the progenitors settling
in this country at an early date. Mrs. Greenlees
is one of thirteen children, two of whom

HI~STOR Y PTXS

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed September 18, 2014.