History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

88 HITR FTXS

however, when fears were excited by a litigation
that the public would recognize it as a
violation of the colonization law.
RELI(TON.
In regard to religion, the Texas colonists
at this early date had neither the opportunity
nor inclination to practice it. A traveler
there in 1831 says: "The people of this
country seem to have forgotten that there is
such a commandment as ' Remember the Sabbath
day to keep it holy.' This day is generally
spent in visiting, driving stock and
breaking mustangs." Having furnished the
required certificate of his Catholic faith, the
Anglo-American eased his conscience by refraining
from any practical expression of it.
In other respects than these already mentioned,
as causing dissatisfaction between the
State and the colonists, the government
showed itself otherwise favorably disposed toward
them. Hitherto they were left unmnolested
in the management of their internal
affairs. In 1827 and 1828 parties were authorized
to sink artesian wells, develop coal
mines, navigate the Rio Grande by steam, etc.
TIHE FINAL REVOLUTION.
The first indication of the approaching
crisis which resulted in the revolution for independence,
was in 1826, when the AngloAmerican
element of the population began to
resist oppression. The entering wedge is
thus very carefully described in Bancroft's
history.
"Hayden Edwards, in 1825, after much
trouble succeeded in obtaining from the Coahuila
and Texas government a coni-act to
settle 800 families on lands surrionding
Nacogdoches. Returning to the United

States he spared no pains in endeavoring to
fulfill his contract, at the same time inducing
his brother, Major Benjamin W. Edwards, to
go to Texas and aid him in establishing his
colony. Foote says that the latter visited
Austin and had a long conversation with him
on the subject of Texas colonization; that
these two agreed that 'the firm establishment
in this favored country of the institutions of
civil and religious freedom, and the redemption
of a region from foreign rule which
rightfully belonged to the United States, and
of which they had been notoriously bereaved
by fraudulent negotiations, was desirable aid
practicable; but that they also agreed that the
colonies would have yet to suffer a great deal
before they would be strong enough to throw
off the yoke.' It is difficult, however, to believe
that Austin expressed any idea that
fraud had been practiced on the United
States.
6" In October, 1825, IIayden Edwards returned
to Texas and took up his residence at
Nacogdoches. He soon discovered that he
had difficulties to contend with that had
never troubled Austin. Portions of the lands
conceded to him were already occupied by
Mexican settlers, some of whom had been
driven from their homes after the destruction
of Long's expedition, and had recently returned.
Nacogdoches had again about 100
inhabitants, and certain of the villainous class,
formerly of the 'neutral grounds,' had taken
up lands. These latter, without regarding,
Edwards with any particular aversion, were
wholly averse to subordination; while the
Mexicans, jealous of his authority and angry
at an American being placed over them,
showed marked symptoms of unfriendliness.
There were, moreover, among them many
turbulent and bad characters, and not a few
fugitives from justice. The result was that,

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HISSTORY F EXS

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed October 21, 2014.