History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISTORY OF TEXAS. :389

regiment. He died at Little Rock during
the early years of the war, a brave soldier
and a good citizen. HI-e was the father of
four children: Adeline, who was married
to J. J. Bostick and now lives in Erath
county, this State; Lucien, who died at the
age of thirty in Milami county; Benjamin
F., of this article; and Margaret, who died at
the age of seven.
Benjamin F. Stidham was born in Milani
county, this State, February 8, 1861, and was
raised here. October 14, 1885, he married Miss
Mollie L. Harrell, daughter of T. W. Harrell,
a sketch of whom appears in this work.
Mr. and Mrs. Stidham's children are:
Thonmas, Viola A. and Robert Grady. Mr.
Stidham, having been reared on the farm,
took up farming pursuits on arriving at his
majority and has been so engaged since.
He is an intelligent and progressive young
man fully worthy of the stock from which
he descended.
J L. WHITTENBURG, a farmer of Williamnson
county, was born in Monroe
county, Missouri, a son of Andrew
W hittenburg. The latter's father, Joseph
Whittenburg, came from Germany to east
Tennessee, where Andrew was born in 1790.
In 1816 Andrew Whittenburg married Anna
Long. In 1819 they removed to Missouri,
but a few years afterward returned to Bedford
county, Tennessee.
J. L. Whittenburg, the subject of this
sketch, moved to the Creek Purchase, Talladega
county, Alabama, in 1832, when twelve
years of age, and remained in that county
twenty years. In the fall of 1852 he located
on his present farm in Williamson county,
Texas. He has killed buffaloes within a mile

of where he now lives, and his first crop was
planted on the open prairie, the children
watching it during the day, and there being
no trouble during the nights. After plowing
tine he fenced it with split rails. The family
first lived in a log house, ald the lumber
for their present building was hauled from
Bastrop. Mr. Whittenburg is a worthy representative
of the land-owning element of this
county, an element which in times past furnished
the brain and brawn that dethroned
tyranny. He owns 250 acres of fine land,
sixty acres of which are well improved, and
the remainder in pasture.
December 22, 1840, he was united in marriage
to Lovinia Hoyle, a daughter of Jacob
and Leah (Robinson) Iloyle, the former a
native of Germany and the latter of North
Carolina. The father died in 1841 and the
mother in 1843. They were the parents of
four sons and five daughters, three of whoimi
are still living: Mrs. Whittenburg, Phillip
H. and Jacob F. Mr. and Mrs. Whittenburg
have had four children. Sarah Caroline, the
eldest child, is the widow of W. A. Miller.
They llad five children: George A., Lucy R.,
William L., Walter S. and Margaret Eva.
The second child, Martha Emeline, is the wife
of S. K. P. Jackson, County Treasurer of
Williamson county, and they have two children:
Lucy B. and Hugh. George L., the
next in order of birth, was first married to
Prudie Hoover, and they had three children:
George A., Margaret L. and Joseph L. The
wife and mother died, and the father again
married, the day before his parents' golden
wedding, and to the last union was born one
child, Charlie Louise. Margaret Angeline,
the youngest child, is the wife of Charles N.
Fleager, a jeweler of Georgetown. Mr. and
Mrs. Whittenburg are members of the
Methodist Church, the former having joined

HISTORY OF TEXAS.l~~iQ

3.89

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed August 1, 2014.