History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISTORY OF TEXAS.

come the partner of his joys and sorrows. No
letters had passed between them during his
lone absence, and the bride-to-be concluded
that she would never again behold the object
of her love. A worthy young man in the
community offered his hand after a brief
courtship and was accepted, the wedding
occurring only a few hours before the appearance
of her faithful William. This was a
severe blow and was a loss keenly felt for
some time. Mr. McCutcheon returned to
Texas in the spring of 1835, and not long
afterward the worthy lady with whom lie now
lives became his wife. He was a conspicuous
figure in much of the Indian trouble occurring
as long as the red mnan continued to
visit the settlements on the Colorado. He
participated in the Brushy creek fight, which
lasted from 10 A. M. until dark. The loss of
the whites was four men; that of the Indians
not known, but it must have been heavy, as
the battle ground had the appearance of a
veritable slaughter pen. After the killing of
the Gocher family the Indians were followed
and overtaken and a fight ensued in which
three men were lost. The Pecan Bayou fight
was also participated in by Mr. MeCutcheon.
Here twenty-seven whites were followed and
attacked by 100 Indians. Tile latter, however
were finally driven off and without loss
to the whites. Mr. MeCutcheon enlisted in
Captain Bean's company at Troy, Missouri,
for service in the Black Hawk war. The
command rendezvoused at St. Charles, Missouri,
and were ordered to Rock Island, Illinois,
where General Scott was in command.
Black Hawk had been captured and sent to
Washington city, and the objects of the Government
had been accomplished. At Rock
Island the troops were decimated by the
cholera, but Mr. McCuteheon escaped without
an attack.

For a number of years Mr. McCutcheon
was engaged ill wagonling in Texas. 11 i.;
teams numberedl each six or eight yoke of
fine cattle, the trips lie made to Hlouston for
goods are almost countless, a',d the incidents
of this experience as told by himl are exceedingly
entertaining. While he was teaming,
his wife, with the help of her sons, was superintending
the farmn, both while they lived
in Travis and Williamson counties, and it
was to her good management that the prosperity
of the family was in part due. In
1865 Mr. McCutcheon moved to Williamson
county from Lampasas, where lie had resided
only a few years. He owns a fine farm oil
Brushy creek and is in a position to spend
his declining years in comfort.
The grandfather of our subject was William
McCutcheon; born in Tennessee in
1790; died there in 1865. He was a prominent
military man during the Civil war, being
a Quartermaster in the Confederate army.
Ile was very enthusiastic in the success of
the Southern cause, and while laboring in the
field contracted a heavy cold and died. His
father, and the founder of this family in the
United States, was John McCutcheon, who
emigrated from Ireland. The place of his
settlement, however, is not exactly known.
He was a prosperous farmer and became a
wealthy man, as popular as he was well known.
He married in the old country a tall, blackeyed
and dignified lady, while he himself was
stout, short and jolly. One of Mrs. McCutcheon's
sisters, "Aunt Polly," became
the wife of one of the governors of Tennessee.
John McCatcheon's children were Samuel,
William, Polly, Ellen, and probably others.
Mrs. McCutcheon was Elizabeth Jane
Harrell, a daughter of Jesse Harrell, a pioneer
of Missouri. At a very early age Mrs.
McCutcheon was left an orphan and reared

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 13, 2014.