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History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISTORY OF TEXAS.

by Jacob Harrell, an uncle. The children of
this marriage were: Willis, a resident of Lavaca
county, Texas; Mary, wife of Jack
Jones; John, mention of whom is made elsewhere
in this work; J. A.; J. T.; Sallie, wife
of Albert Highsmith, Williamson county;
George; W. F., deceased; Fannie E., wife of
Tom Evans; Elizabeth, wife of Warren
Swindoll; James; Beauregard, a stock dealer
in Western Texas; and Jefferson, deceased.
Jesse A. McCutcheon was fairly educated,
and just before he reached his majority engaged
in teaching. The war coming on he
left the school-room to become a soldier. He
entered Colonel Crisp's regiment, and later
on went into the Missouri State service under
General Shely:. He fought and starved
and endured all the privations incident to a
four years' war. The winter before the close
he went home on a furlough and while there
joined a company for service in the Rio
Grande country, where he was on duty when
news of the surrender reached him. The
company broke up at once and young McCutcheon
came back to Williamson county.
He was then attracted to the stock business
and in this he embarked, being interested
with his father and brothers. They drove
herds north into Kansas, Nebraska and Wyoming,
and followed the business with profit
until 1870.
While in Kansas City preparing for
a return trip on one occasion, Mr. McCutcheon
remained behind the other men of
the company for the purpose of looking up a
stray mule and was thus detained in the city
a day. Before he had overtaken his party,
and while at Westport, men halted him in
the road and demanded his valuables. These
consisted of some change in a small purse
and $1,300 in an inside vest pocke! By
keeping a strict watch on the fellows, Mr.

McCutcheon was enabled to slip a couple
of pistols from his saddle pockets, and by
his bravery succeeded in escaping without
financial loss.
From the stock business he went to'the
farm, where he has continued up to the
present time and with marked success. He
owns 380 acres of land, 270 of which are
under cultivation. In 1892 his cotton crop
amounted to 126 bales.
Mr. McCutcheon was married in October,
1872, to Sue Noble, daughter of E. P. and
Sarah M. (Callioun) Noble, of South Carolina.
Her parents had twelve children, eight
of whom are living, viz.: Mrs. John Bennett,
Mrs. McCutcheon, Mies E. F. Noble, E. P.
Noble, Jr., A. B. Noble, William C. Noble,
Mrs. Dr. P. J. Bowers and G. Alexander Noble.
Mr. and Mrs. McCutcheon are the parents
of six children: Pickens Noble, Elizabeth
Jane, Jesse A., William C., Sarah Margaret,
and John Willis.
Politically, Mr. McCutcheon is a loyal
Democrat; religiously, a Presbyterian; and
socially, an agreeable and popular gentleman.
J E. TODD, a progressive farmer and
stock-raiser of Milam county, was born
in Polk county, Georgia, on the 12th
day of January, 1859, and is a son of John
Todd, who was born in Anderson district,
South Carolina, in 1821. John Todd was
the younger of two sons born to Andrew
and Olive Todd, who also were South Carolinians
by birth. He was reared in his'native
State to about the age of twenty, when
he emigrated to Georgia, where he married
Sarah, a daughter of Lewis and Mahala Sherrill,
and engaged in school-teaching and in

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed September 30, 2014.