History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

402 ilISTORY OF TEXAS.

and moved to his present home. This contained,
at that time, ninety acres, and was
owned by J. M. Killen. The profits of the
place have been sunk in good black soil as
they accumulated, 738 acres being the sum
total of his real holdings, 300 acres of which
he cultivates. Hog creek runs through the
farm, giving it good drainage and an ample
water supply. In the management of his
plantation, Mr. Askew shows rare tact and
good judgment. His home is a model of
neatness, and there hospitality reigns, even
strangers being made to feel at home while
under his roof.
In 1882, Mr. Askew engaged in feeding
stock for market, ranging from 50 to 200
head, and his farm stock is of his own raising.

Elective office our subject has never held,
but he is Notary Public of his precinct, and
is Postmaster of Baileyville, appointed in
1890. In September, 1890, he bought out
C. W. J. Bailey's general merchandise business
in Bailevville. He carries a stock of
$3,500, his sales being $8,000 annually.
Mr. Askew is a Democrat. and a leader
and molder of opinion in his county. Our
subject was born in Georgia, in 1847, and
is a son of H. J. Askew, who was born in
the same State, in 1816. He received no
education, but it was mainly his own fault,
as he did not feel disposed to go to school,
and became a successful farmer until the
opening of the war. He lost heavily, then,
and has never recovered. In 1852 he removed
to Alabama, residing there until 1887,
when he came to Texas in order to be among
his children. He had been a soldier under
Jackson in the Indian war.
The mother of our subject was in her
maiden days Miss Eleanor Maddox, an/ the
following children were born of that union:

James, killed at Atlanta; Joseph W.; Uriah,
deceased, and Charlie. Mrs. ALkew died in
1862. Two years later he married Mrs.
Elliott, the sister of his first wife, and a
daughter of William Maddox, of Georgia.
By this marriage there were born the following
children: John; Fannie, who married
B. P. Bozeman; Benjamin; Sidney and Robert.
Our subject married in October, 1887,
Miss Mollie, a daughter of Milton Cargill,
deceased, from Louisiana. Mr. Cargill married
a daughter of McClem Taylor. Mr. and
Mrs. Askew are the parents of two children:
W. Lucian and Gladys.
W. PORTER, an honored pioneer of
Burleson county, Texas, who has contributed
by his enterprise and worthy
character to the upbuilding and welfare of
his community, was born in Kentucky, September
18, 1836. His parents, Benjamin J.
and Matilda J. (Wilson) Porter, were also natives
of that beautiful and historic State, his
father being an old resident of Butler county.
Benjamin J. was of Irish descent, and
in his younger days was engaged in school
teaching. In 1846 he emigrated with his
family to the new and unsettled country of
Texas, making the Louisiana journey by flatboat
and steamer up the Red river to Shreveport,
thence by wagons to Texas, arriving in
Burleson county in March, 1847. Here he
settled on land which he industriously cultivated
and also engaged in stock-raising, in
both of which he was satisfactorily successful.
He was strongly Democratic in his political
views and took quite an active part in public
affairs. He was for many years a devoted
member of the Baptist Church. This good
man was lost to a sorrowing family and com

403

R2ISTORYOFTEAS

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 29, 2014.