History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

420 HIS T O R Y I~~~~~ O TX

3, 1,46, his horse stumbled and fell on him,
and he died the following day. The mother
was spared to her family for many years,
dying January 19, 1884, at the age of
seventy-nine years.
Aaron F. Boyce was born February 29,
1840. At the opening of the late war he
joined Company F, Eighteenth Texas Cavalry,
and participated in the battles of Cotton
Plant, Arkansas Post, Harrisonburg,
Natchez, Mansfield and Pleasant Hill. At
the last engagement he was severely wounded
in his left hand, returned home on a furlough,
and never again entered the army.
After returning home lie was elected County
Clerk of Travis county, and held that position
until'the close of hostilities. He now
owns a fine farm of 330 acres, 125 acres of
which is cultivated. In his political relations
he acts with the Democratic party,
and socially is a member of the Masonic
fraternity.
Mr. Boyce was married in Travis county,
February 28, 1866, to Mary M. Cain, a native
of IIot Springs county, Arkansas, who came
with her parents to Texas in 1855. She was
a daughter of J. Y. and Philadelphia Cain.
Mr. and Mrs. Boyce have seven children:
lmogene, now Mrs. Ira Aten, of Castro
county, Texas; John Ely, also of that county;
Elizabeth, Isabelle, Benjamin, David and Lucile.

William Boyce was born on the place he
now occupies, January 17, 1842. In the fall
of 1861 he enlisted as a private in Company
F, Darnell's cavalry regiment, went first to
Indian Territory, and thence to Arkansas,
where he participated in the battle of Arkansas
Post. The entire company was captured
there, and taken to Camp DQtuglas,
Chicago. While on the road measles and
small-pox broke out, and many of the soldiers

fell by the dread hand of disease. Mr. Boyce
was captured January 11, 1863, and held a
prisoner untilthe following April, when he
was exchanged at City Point, Virginia. He
again enlisted for service, entering Granbury's
Texas brigade of infantry, took part
in several small engagements, and was twice
wounded in the battle of Chickamauga, in
the left shoulder and head, which rendered
him unfit for duty, and he retired from the
army.
Mr. Boyce now owns 360 acres of good
land, 250 acres of which is cultivated. He
is a Democrat in his political views, and
socially is a Master Mason.
November 4, 1868, near Austin, our subject
was married to Kate, a daughter of
Samuel and Mary A. (Chunn) Stone. The
father built and ran the first ferryboat across
the Colorado river in Bastrop county. They
were the parents of six children: Martha,
decea-ed; John B., in Mexico; Thomas H.,
of Martindale, Texas; Samuel T., of Austin;
Charles W., a resident of Lockhart, Texas;
and Kate, wife of our subject. The following
was written on the occasion of the death
of Mr. Stone:
"Our community was pained to learn on
Friday last of the death of Samuel Stone,
proprietor of the ferry below the city, and
one of our oldest citizens. Mr. Stone has
had a long and eventful life. He was born
in Bedford county, Virginia, in 1797, and
was consequently in his sixtieth year. He
enlisted as a soldier in the American army in
1814. In 1819 he moved to Tennessee, then
a frontier of almost unbroken forests. In
1824 he moved to Alabama, having married
in Tennessee. In 1829 he again removed,
this time to Missouri. Under the impulse
which ever drove him toward a new country,
lie moved in 1839 to Texas, then far less

420

HIS~STORY P EX8

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed September 3, 2015.