History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

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I ITOYO TEA

nFerce was altogether internal, while Texas
possessed great natural advantages for the
development of an extensive commercial business
with foreign countries. Also, in climate
and industrial pursuits, the contrast was
equally marked, and the productions were
dissimilar. Pastoral and mining occupations
prevailed in Coahuila, while Texas was essentially
an agricultural country, and cotton,
sugar and the cereals were cultivated with
most flattering prospects. Texas also labored
under the disadvantage of being much more
remote from the higher courts, which gave
the wealthier classes an undue advantage in
litigation; and even in criminal cases justice
was not so prompt or exact.
Directly after the Mexican troops were all
withdrawn from Texas in 1832, the colonists
began to take measures to address the national
government on the subject of their aspirations,
namely, a greater recognition of
their material interests and of more local
government. In October of this year a preliminary
convention of delegates from different
municipalities was held at San Felipe,
and some discussion took place concerning
the formation of a State constitution; but as
sufficient notice had not been given and the
attendance was slim, the convention adjourned
without taking action. Their discussion,
however, brought the matter seriously before
the public, and when the second convention
assembled, April 1, 1833, it was prepared to
accomplish the work assigned to it. At
this convention were Stephen F. Austin,
Branch T. Archer, David G. Burnett, Sam
Houston, J. B. Miller and William H. Wharton,
the last mentioned being the president
of that body. A committee was appointed
to draft a form of State constitution, and another
committee was appointed to draw up a
memorial petitioning the general government

to grant a separation of Texas from Coahuila.
Sam Houston was appointed chairman of the
first, and David G. Burnett of the second.
The constitution drafted was thoroughly
republican in form, modeled on that of the
United States. After much discussion it
was concluded that banking should not be
provided for by that constitution, and that
the document should maintain absolute silence
with reference to religious liberty, such
was the blighting power of Catholic influence.

The commissioners appointed to convey
the petition for separation to .the city of
Mexico were Stephen F. Austin, William H.
Wharton and J. B. Miller; but Austin was
the only member who actually went there;
and on arrival he found that city the scene
of virulent party faction and political confusion.
Affairs in Mexico had been undergoing
the customary vicissitudes and revulsions.
No more stability of principle was
observable in Santa Anna than in Bustainante.
Both used the constitution of 1824
to push themselves into power, and then both
cast it to the winds. By the end of 1832
these two generals, after much bloodshed,
came to terms, and agreed to unite in support
of the said constitution.
March 30, 1833, Santa Anna was declared
duly elected president of the Republic of
Mexico, and Goinez Farias, vice-president;
and from this time on Santa Anna's course
was remarkable for subtle intrigue for selfish
purposes. He never appeared, however, as
the principal actor, but always used other
parties as'cat's-paws for his own advancement.
-Dictatorial power was his highest
ambition. Farias was the known champion
of reform, and Santa Anna absented himself
from the capital to intrigue with bishops and
religious orders, leaving his colleague at the

ITISTORY OP TEXA&.

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed December 17, 2014.