History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

I

fevered brows of their dying comrades still
bubbles forth its sparkling waters as on that
memorable day, mnrinuring on eternal
requiem to the memory of the heroes who so
nobly perished to protect their homes and
loved ones. The battle-ground is now enclosed
in a farm and all that marks the scene
of this desperate conflict is a clump of alanmo
blanco trees, living monuments to the memnory
of the fallen heroes.
Captain Bird left surviving himn a widow
and four children. His widow, whose maiden
name was Sarah Dellton, was a daughter of
Benjamin Denton, a native of Tennessee,
where she was born about 1800. She died in
Burleson county, in 1870. The eldest child
of Captain Bird was a daughter, Nancy J.,
who was six times married, and the mother
of a large number of children, and %1ho is now
deceased. His eldest son was Willialn P.,
whose name heads this sketch. The two
younger children were Thomas J. and Wincey,
the former a son and the latter a daughter,
both twice married and the parents of a nunmber
of children. Thomas is still living, be-'
ing a resident of 3Burleson county, and the
daughter is deceased.
William P. Bird, the eldest son of this
pioneer family and one of the oldest settlers
now living in Burleson county was born in
Perry county, Tennessee, October 28, 1819.
He was about ten years old when his parents
came to Texas. He received scarcely any
education as there were no schools in Texas
when he was a boy. His time was chiefly
occupied after he reached his twelfth year in
looking after his father's cattle over the
range, Captain Bird soon after corning to
Texas, having contracted to care for a large
number of cattle on the shares. Young
William made an effort to enter the Texas
army for service against Santa Anna, but

there was no organization in reach except
that of his father, which his father refused
to let him enter as his services were needed
at home.
In 1843 Mr. Bird married Miss Callie R.
Powell, a daughter of John and Celia Powell,
then residing in Austin county, this State.
Mrs. Bird's parents moved from Ohio to
Texas in 1833. She was born in Ohio and
was one of six children.
Mr. Bird settled in Burleson county in
1846 and has resided liere since that date.
lie has been engaged in farming and stockraising
all his life and has met with moderate
success. He lihas given his attention elntirely
to his own interests, never having concerned
himself with public matters nor held
any public offices. Ile and his wife have
raised a'family of eight children, two sons
and six daughters, all of whom were married
and all but two of whom are living. IIis
eldest, Elizabeth, was married to George
Shephard and is now deceased; Melissa is
the widow of Frank Zarr, of Temple, Texas;
Isaac, died in Burleson county, leaving no
children; Sallie is the wife of Jasper HIaney;
John; Wincey is the wife of J. M. Hladdox;
Laura is the wife of Charles Morgan; and
Dollie is the wife of C. P. IIall,-the last five
being residents of Burleson county.
The religious connection of the family is
with the Baptist Church. In politics Mr.
Bird formerly voted with the Democratic
party but in recent years lie has espoused the
cause of the Populists.
J OHN E. CAMPBELL, of Travis county,
Texas, is of Scotch-Irish descent, and
the family have resided in this country
for about 200 years. His parents, John and

HIS TOY (F 2EXA7 I

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 22, 2014.