History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISTORY 01 TEo A AyAy. 47

When Tenorio reported these proceedings
to hib superior officer, he was sent on a still
more uncalled-for errand.
A Mexican Republican, Lorenzo de Zavala,
had taken refuge in Texas, and Santa Anna,
fearing his influence, ordered his arrest; but
no one would undertake the task. Another
order was sent from headquarters to arrest
R. M. Williamson, W. B. Travis, Samuel M.
Williams, Moseley Baker, F. W. Johnson
and John H. Moore, and a subsequent order
included the names of J. M. Carravahal and
Juan Zambrano. The two last, being Mexican
citizens, were carried off; but the job
of arresting the first six persons was considered
so dangerous that no officer had the
temerity to attempt it. In addition to these
Mexican outrages on the Texans, the Indians
were becoming troublesome. Merchants and
traders were intercepted and killed, and their
goods carried off. But these Indian outrages
served one important purpose; they gave the
Texans an excuse for forming companies,
procuring arms and drilling ostensibly for
operations against the savages, but really to
resist the encroachments of the despotic Mexican
government. The companies were called
"committees of safety," and their business
was to disseminate information, secure arms,
ammunition, etc. A central committee was
also formed, which met at San Felipe, and an
administrative council was organized. The
council sent Messrs. Barrett and Gritton to
San Antonio on a mission of peace to General
Ugartechea, but nothing was accomplished.
Stephen F. Austin, in the meantime,
was returning, when he was made
chairman of the council at San Felipe. He
expressed regret at the action of his friends,
and stated that he had hoped to find everything
peaceful.

Santa Anna still professed to have the kindest
feelings toward the Texans, and he authorized
Austin to tell his people thlli he was
their friend, and that lie desired their pro;perity;
that he would do all he could to promote
it, and that in the new constitution lie
would use his influence to have conditions
therein to give Texas a special organization,
suited to their education and habits. But
Santa Anna could be nothing but treacherous,
as the treatment of the people in that portion
of the State occupied by his troops but ill accord
with his professions of good will. Citizens
were arrested, money forced from those
who fell into the hands of the despot's miniions,
and communities strippe I of their arIhll
the soldiers compelling families to support
them, the attempt to disarm all citizens being
a principal feature of the plan of subjugation.
Captain Castenado was sent to G(otzales to
seize a small cannon which had been given to
the corporation for protection against Indians.
The citizens were unwilling to part with their
gun, and prepared to resist the demand of
Castenado, who had 150 soldiers to back hi in.
A company was organized, which charged tlhe
Mexicans and put them to flight in disorder.
The news of this conflict roused a warlike
spirit in the Texans. A company was raise i
to capture the Mexican garrison at (3oliad.
Captain George Collingsworth led the party,
and almost without firing a gun the exultant
Texans made prisoners of the whole force,
about twenty-five, including Colonel Sandoval,
besides obtaining 300 stand of arms and military
stores to the amount of $10,000. The
Mexican fort at Lipantitlan was also captured
shortly after.
Not only had Austin returned, but the
noted Benjamin R. Milam had escaped from
Monterey and returned and joine I tlhe patriot
forces. Austin, who was a born commander,

I

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed March 31, 2015.