History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HIISTORY OF TEXAS.

hit effects from Twiggs county, Georgia, to
Covington county, Alabama, where he died
in 1821, from the effects of a wound from a
falling tree.
Mr. Bozeman was a fine mechanic, being
skilled both in wood and iron, and was a
gunsmith also. He was a fine marksman,
and had a great taste for the sports of hunting
and fishing. By occupation he was a
farmer, and made it successful. Politically,
lie was a Democrat, and religiously a member
of the Baptist Church. Nathan BozenJan was
born October 7, 1785, and November 1, 1807,
married Miss Harriet Knotts, of Burke
county, Georgia, near Waynesboro. Mr.
Knotts was born in South Carolina in 1745,
and was a colonial soldier in the war of the
Revolution. In 1819 Nathan Bozeman
Inoved to Covington county, Alabama, and
six years later removed to Butler county,
near Greenville, and finally moved, in 1838,
to Coosa county, where lie died ten years
later, October 11, 1848. He was a man of
great industry, and public-spirited to a
remarkable degree. He used to say that the
sound of many axes in forest and field was
the sweetest music he ever heard, and always
believed in all of the members of his household
having employment. He accumulated
a good property, and won a high place in
public esteem. As a valuable and honorable
citizen, Nathan Bozenman will always be
remembered. His family consisted of eleven
children, the fourth of which family was
David Wood Bozeman, the father of our
subject.
The birth of David W. Bozeman took
place February 16, 1814, and he received
the rudiments of an education in his native
State. When only eighteen years of/ge he
married Miss Ann English Browning, a lady
of fifteen. For many years of his life Mr.

Bozeman was engaged as an overseer, and as
his means accumulated he invested in negro
property, whose labor made him rich rapidly.
HIe bought and managed large estates and
became one of the most successful financiers
of the State of Alabama. Moneyed corporations
sought his assistance and counsel, and
the State his services. He was an ardent
Democrat of the States-Right stripe, and of
pronounced disunion sentiments when the
question union was being agitated.
In 1860 he was a delegate to the convention
which nominated John C. Breckenridge
to the Presidency. The next year he took
his seat in the Alabama Legislature, and was
an active participant in the deliberations of
that day. In 1855 Mr. Bozeman established
himself at Wetumpka, Alabama, in the banking
business, and was very prosperous when
the Civil war came on and swept away at
one breath $56,000. His reverses might have
crippled him seriously had he not made a
speculative trip to Texas in 1857 and invested
largely in western lands in Milam and Tom
Green counties. He had visited the State
even earlier than that, being here on an
exploring tour in 1851.
After the war Mr. Bozeman came to Milam
county and gave his attention to farming and
speculating in land. He had a strong desire
for the excitement incident to a campaign in
politics. He was a great reader, and when
called upon for a speech always had something
interesting to give his hearers. He
was once a candidate for the State Senate in
Texas. In the latter part of his life he united
with the Missionary Baptist Church. His
habits were always temperate and moral. In
personal appearance he was tall, with black
hair and eyes and olive complexion, and great
firmness marked his dealings with those
under him, and what he said he meant and

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed October 31, 2014.