History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISTORY OF TEXAS.

Milani county a year or two later. The
father died in Cameron in 1870, aged fiftythree,
and the mother in 1872, at the same
age. Of their twelve children only five are
now livi ng,-Caroline (Mrs. Yoe), Albert,
Charles, Lu and David,-three dying of yellow
fever in Houston shortly after the faniily
came to the State, and four inl Cameron. It
would be depriving this sketch of part of its
interest and robbing a good woman of lher
just deserts, not to add that much to the
success which Mr. Yoe has attained lhas been
due to the kindly counsel and efficient aid
which he has received at the hands of the
lady whom he selected now more than twenty
years ago for a companion, and who during
all these years has borne him a faithful and
affectionate companionship.
P HILIP DANIEL KOONTZ, a
stockman, residing tweve miles north
of Georgetown, in Glasscock valley,
is the only son of W. A. and Louisa
(Counts) Koontz, of German descent. The
mother's name is but the English spelling of
the father's name. The paternal family located
in Rockinglam county, Virginia, in an
early day, and the grandfather of our subject
afterward moved to Madison county, Ohio.
W. A. Koontz was born in Virginia, was
reared to manhood and married in Ohio;
taught school in that State several years, and
then began a broker's business, which, in connection
with banking, he followed until late
in life. He then, having made a fortune,
retired from active life, and now resides in
Sedalia, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Koontz had
two children, and the daughter, now deceased,
was the wife of J. M. Stroup, a prominent and
successful merchant of Sedalia.

P. D. Koontz was born in Mallisoin county,
Ohio, April 21, 1,-89, aind was educated at
the Ohio Wesleyan College, at I )elawa le,
Ohio, and at tle Antioch College, at Yellow
Springs, same State. 3IMch of lis. early life
was given to travel and recreation. Raised
in the Buckeye State by indulgent and wellto-do
parents, and educated at the best of
northern schools, Mr. Koontz yet saw fit, in
his young manhood, to cast his lot among tl~i,
people of Williamson county, where, for
twenty years, he has successfully tried tlle
virtue of Texas soil and climate. lie was induced
to come to this county by tlse father
(now deceased) and an uncle of Caltain J. V.
Rumsey, of Corn Hill. Arriving in this
neighborhood in the fall of 1872, Mr. Koontz
purchased 100 acres of improved land in the
Glasscock valley, known as the Tremblle
farm. This was the beginning of his Texas
life, and, although he has spent a part of the
intervening time at his boyhood's home, he
has ever since maintained his residence here.
To the original purchase he has gradually
added until lie now owns 2,000 acres, 600
acres of which is under a fine state of cultivation.
This is one of the best farms in
Williamson county. Mr. Koontz gives special
attention to the raising of Poland-China
swine.
In this county, in 1872, our subject was
united in marriage to Miss Emer Marrs, who
died four years later. They had two children:
Iosa Winetka, wife of John. E. King,
Jr., of Williamson county; and Emola Glen,
wife of Thomas S. King, also of this county.
May 2, 1881, Mr. Koontz married Fannie
L. Orebaugh, a daughter of John L. and
Emily (Jones) Orebaugh. Her ancestors were
of German descent, located in the same county
in Virginia as did Mr. Koontz's people, and
afterward moved to Ohio. John L. Ore

461

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed April 24, 2014.