History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

A

BISTORY OF TEXAS.

wai put in immediate command of the Texan
forces on his arrival at Gonzales, which was
on the 11th of October.
The consultation met October 16, 1835,
but there being only thirty-one members
present an adjournment was made until Nov.
ember 1. November 5 a preamble and set of
resolutions were adopted, in which the declaration
was made that although they repudiated
Santa Anna and his despotic government,
they yet clung to the Constitution of
Mexico of 18240. On November 12 an ordinance
was passed for the creation of a provisional
government, with an executive council,
to be composed of one member from each
municipality. Henry Smith was made Governor,
and James W. Robinson LieutenantGovernor.
Sam Houston, who; it will be
noticed, had figured some little in Texas history
since 1832, was selected to command the
army to be raised.
General Cos, with 500 soldiers, landed at
Pass Cavallo, in September, 1835, and marched
immediately to San Antonio, when he superseded
General Ugartechea. Austin, after
reaching Gonzales, and effecting a reorganization
of the volunteers, started for San Antonio.
He reached the Mission La Espada,
nine miles below the city, on the 20th. On
the 27th, after resting his men, he detached
the companies of Fannin and Bowie, ninetytwo
men, to ascend the river and if practicable
select a more suitable camping ground.
Fannin spent that night in a bend of the San
Antonio river, near the Conception mission.
The point was well chosen, but the Mexicans
looked upon it as simply a trap to secure their
game from, which was all they had to do.
It was a natural fortification, but (GenerIl Cos
thought he had a sure thing of it; o he
marched out in the morning and made an attack.
The Mexicans surrounded their sup

posed prey, and the battle began. The Texans
with their deadly rifles plucked off all the
gunners from the enemy's battery, as they
came within range. A charge was made, or
attempted, three separate times, but they
were hurled back in confusion by the Texans,
who remained masters of the field. Sixteen
dead bodies were found near the abandoned
cannon, which had been discharged but five
times; so true was the aim of the riflemen
that the Mexican gunners were shot before
they could fire, in most cases. This was the
first battle of the Revolution, and the loss of
the Texans was one man-Richard Andrews.
The Mexican loss was about sixty, as every
one of the patriots who fired took-aim and
usually brought down his man. Austin, in
October, moved up about half a mile, on tile
Alamo ditch, near the old mill, and next day
to within one mile east of the city. He had
nearly 1,000 men, but they were ill provided
with arms and ammnnitioui of war, and without
cannon. He was poorly prepared to attack
a larger force than his own in a strongly
fortified city. He, however, sent to Gonzales
for the cannon at that place. Then came a
number of skirmishes with the enemy and
the capture of 300 horses by Bowie. The executive
or general council, in view of the lack
of funds wherewith to provide the supplies,
etc., so much needed at that time, sent Messrs.
Austin, Archer and Wharton as Commissioners
to the United States, in order to negotiate
a loan of $1,000,000 in bonds of
$1,000 each, and the commander-in-chief was
authorized to accept the services of 5,000 volunteers
and 1,200 regulars. Provision was
also made for a navy.
BATTLE OF SAN ANTONIO.
The army encamped before San Antonio
was under General Edward Burleson Many

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed August 30, 2014.