History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

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The artillery, under special command of
Colonel George W. Hockley, Inspector-General,
was placed on the right of the first regiment;
and four companies of infantry, under
the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Henry
Millard, sustained the artillery upon the right.
Our cavalry, sixty-one in number, commanded
by Colonel Mirabeau B. Lamar (whose gallant
and daring conduct on the previous day had
attracted the admiration of his comrades, and
called him to the station), placed on our extreme
right, completed our line. Our cavalry
was despatched to the front of the enemy's
left, for the purpose of attracting their notice,
whilst an extensive island of timber afforded
us an opportunity of concentrating our forces
and displaying from that point, agreeably to
the previous design of the troops. Every
evolution was performed with alacrity, the
whole advancing rapidly in line, and through
an open prairie, without any protection whatever
for our men. The artillery advanced and
took station within 200 yards of the enemy's
breastwork, and commenced an effective fire
with grape and canister.
"Colonel Sherman, with his regiment, having
commenced the action upon our left wing,
the whole line, at the center and on the right,
advancing in double-quick time, rung the war
cry,' Remember the Alamo!' received the enemy's
fire, and advanced within point-blank shot
before a piece was discharged from our lines.
Our lines advanced without a halt until they
were in possession of the woodland and the
enemy's breastwork, the right wing of Burleson's
and the left of Millard's taking possession
of the breastwork, our artillery having
gallantly charged up within seventy yards of
the enemy's cannon, when it was taken by our
troops. The conflict lasted about eighteen
minutes from the time of close action until
we were in possession of the enemy's encamp.

ment, taking one piece of cannon (loaded),
-four stand of colors, all their camp equipage,
stores and baggage. Our cavalry had charged
and routed that of the enemy upon the right,
and given pursuit to the fugitives, which did
not cease until they arrived at the bridge
which I have mentioned before. Captain
Karnes, always among the foremost in danger,
commanded the pursuers. The conflict in
the breastwork lasted but a few moments;
many of the troops encountered hand to hand,
and, not having the advantage of bayonets on
our side, our riflemen used their pieces as war
clubs, breaking many of them off at the breech.
The rout commenced at half-past four, and
the pursuit by the main army continued until
twilight. A guard was then left in charge of
the enemy's encampment, and our army returned
with their killed and wounded. In the
battle our loss was two killed and twenty-three
wounded, six of whom mortally. The enemy's
loss was 630 killed, among whom were one
general officer, four colonels, two lieutenantcolonels,
five captains, twelve lieutenants;
wounded, 208, of whom five were colonels,
three lieutenant-colonels, two second lieutenant-colonels,
seven captains, one cadet; prisoners,
730; President-General Santa Anna,
General Cos, four colonels (aids to General
Santa Anna), and the colonel of the Guerrero
battalion, are included in the number. General
Santa Anna was not taken until the 22d, and
General Cos on yesterday, very few having
escaped. About 600 muskets, 300 sabres and
200 pistols have been collected since the action;
several hundred mules and horses were
taken, and nearly $12,000 in specie. For several
days previous to the action our troops
were engaged in forced marches, exposed to
excessive rains, and the additional inconvenience
of extremely bad roads, ill supplied with
rations and clothing; yet, amid every diffi

57

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed September 20, 2014.